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Investigating effect of changing glucose concentration on respiration in yeast

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Introduction

Investigating the Effect of a Variable on the Rate of Respiration in Yeast Method 1. Make a yeast solution with the yeast concentration of 20% by mixing 4 parts water with 1 part powdered yeast. 2. 20cm3 of this is added to a conical flask 3. ...read more.

Middle

To work out the percentage of glucose solution, I divided the mass of glucose added by 30 as the yeast solution added was 20cm3 and the water 10cm3 hence a total volume of 30cm3. Conical Flask Yeast Solution added (cm3) Volume of water added (cm3) ...read more.

Conclusion

To work out rate of reaction I divided average CO2 by the time taken in seconds (120). Conical Flask Carbon Dioxide Produced (cm3) Rate of Reaction/ cm3 s-1 Repeat 1 Repeat 2 Repeat 3 Average Average CO2/Time (Secs) A 7 7 8 7.33 7.33/120= 0.06 B 17 18 17 17.33 17.33/120= 0.14 C 16 20 19 18.33 18.33/120= 0.15 D 21 20 21 20.67 20.67/120=0.17 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

A good essay for explaining how this type of experiment may be carried out, but does not explain the overall scientific reasoning behind the experiment or explain the results with a conclusion. The student provides a basic response to the ...

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Response to the question

A good essay for explaining how this type of experiment may be carried out, but does not explain the overall scientific reasoning behind the experiment or explain the results with a conclusion. The student provides a basic response to the question and rather than explaining the purpose to the experiment, the science behind it and the prediction they just display a set of results and how they did the experiment, and whilst the overall results are correct and if you had an understanding of the respiration topic you would understand the results, I would like to see a bit more background and scientific explanation in this essay, as well as a prediction and conclusion. Explains how the experiment is done very well.

Level of analysis

The analysis is appropriate for this level as it considers the main factors involved in respiration and uses them appropriately to investigate the question e.g. CO2 output. However, the results are not analysed so there is no knowledge as to if the student understands why they are doing the experiment or if they are just collecting data and following a set experiment. They do not explain why the variable was used and why it would affect yeast respiration.

Quality of writing

The punctuation, spelling and grammar are all fine, and the reader communicates meanings clearly. Also uses the correct units throughout the experiment for the different substances. Could have been a bit more explicit with how to do each part of the experiment and the meaning behind it.


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Reviewed by skatealexia 01/03/2012

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