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Investigating the Respiration of Yeast

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Introduction

Biology - Coursework Investigating The Respiration Of Yeast Factors That Can Affect It In order to alter the respiration of yeast, I will have to change a factor, this could be any of the following things - * Temperature * Amount Of Food (Sugar) * Amount Of Fluid (Water) * Different Types Of Yeast I have decided to investigate the effect of altering the temperature of the experiment. I predict that the rate of CO2 released will increase with the temperature. The theory behind this is quite complex. Energy is required for respiration (in this case, the transforming of Glucose (C6H12O6) ...read more.

Middle

There is no need for an oxygen intake, as this experiment requires Anaerobic Respiration The Equation For The Experiment Is - To carry out this experiment I will need: - * Electronic Scales * Conical Flask * Water Bath * Bunsen Burner * Tripod * Heat-Proof Mat * Tubing (With Bung) * Measuring Cylinder * Thermometer * Yeast * Sugar * Stopwatch I will Construct my experiment like this: - Method - 1. Heat the water to a desired temperature, using the thermometer to record the heat. 2. Once the water is at the desired temperature, take the heat off, and place in the yeast and sugar mix into the conical flask 3. ...read more.

Conclusion

liquid product immediately/safely * Keep the Bunsen on a safety flame when not in use * Use a heat proof mat Time (Seconds) 150C 200C 250C 300C 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 *I am unsure about the duration of the experiment at the time of writing this plan, so I have decided to opt for 4 minutes, however, this time may be shortened of lengthened if the 'Test' experiment provides results. I may also however take readings with the water at higher temperatures, most likely going up to 500C Any changes I make will be enclosed on a separate sheet with the conclusion titled 'Changes To Plan'. There will also be an updated version of the results table on that sheet. James Maiden 10w ...read more.

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