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Investigation into rates of reaction decolourising acidified potassium permanganate with glucose.

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Introduction

James Pearson 11h Investigation into rates of reaction decolourising acidified potassium permanganate with glucose Introduction During the course of several lessons we planned and executed an experiment to investigate the rates of reaction decolourising acidified potassium permanganate with glucose. After a short amount of time we would be able to determine whether or not the reaction had finished because the solution would become colourless. When conducting this experiment, one should consider the two following variables: the temperature of the solution and the concentration of glucose in the experiment. For the duration of this particular experiment I chose to vary the concentration of the glucose. Prediction I predict that the higher the concentration of glucose in each solution, the faster it will react with the potassium permanganate. This is because glucose breaks down the particles of potassium. This will cause the solution to decolourise over a smaller interval of time. ...read more.

Middle

The time will be recorded when each test tube becomes colourless. These results will then be noted down in a results table, displaying whether or not the prediction was correct. To make the experiment fair, there are a few variables to consider keeping the same. The temperature of the boiling tubes must remain at room temperature and must be the same for each tube, heat can speed up the rate of a reaction and could effect the results. The same amount of potassium permanganate must be placed in each tube, aswell as the same amount of sulphuric acid, the only chemical amount that changes is that of the glucose and water. Table of Results Tube# Result Potassium Permanganate (cm�) Glucose (cm�) Water (cm�) Time (secs) 1 Yes 2 1 9 249 2 Yes 2 2 8 223 3 Yes 2 3 7 208 4 Yes 2 4 6 167 5 Yes 2 5 5 140 6 Yes 2 6 4 ...read more.

Conclusion

This was not the only reason for not easily recording the exact amount of liquid. Surface tension causes it to form a meniscus that magnetically attracts itself to the side of the syringe forming a dip that can easily make it harder to measure accurately with the human eye. When measuring the amount of liquid it is important to make sure you are making the reading at eye level as a slight tilt on the syringe would cause the measurer to view it at the wrong angle, making a 1cm� area of error. It is impossible to judge correctly when the solution goes completely colourless unless the proper equipment is used. In this experiment all we used were our eyes, which were nowhere near as accurate. To measure this correctly, a special light sensor would be needed to read the amount of light passing through, therefore showing when it has gone completely colourless. None of our results were anomalous, they all lay on the line and proved our prediction was correct. ...read more.

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