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Investigation into the alcohol fermentation of yeast

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Introduction

Investigation into the alcohol fermentation of yeast Aim: To find out about the products of alcoholic fermentation. We are trying to see if yeast can respire anaerobically at different temperatures. Before I begin the experiment i am going to explain the main facts of this study. Background information: Aerobic respiration is when something respires with air, whereas, anaerobic respiration is when something respires without air. Most organisms will die without oxygen but in some cases, glucose may still be broken down and energy transferred. Alcoholic fermentation is another way to respire anaerobically and involves converting glucose into alcohol. The formula for anaerobic respiration is: glucose + alcohol carbon dioxide + energy As with aerobic respiration, carbon dioxide gas is given off. Alcoholic fermentation is far less efficient at giving energy than aerobic respiration. ...read more.

Middle

Glucose, yeast, limewater, and a very thin layer of paraffin. Safety: * Goggles and lab coats must be worn at all times. * Substances must not be touched, tasted or smelt. * Hands must be washed once experiments have been completed. * Reactions must be observed carefully. Fair Test: * The seal between the bung and the test tube must be air tight. * Use a thin layer of paraffin each time. * Use the same amount of glucose solution and yeast each time. * Experiment could be performed more than once. Factors to control and vary: For each experiment, the factors to control are the amount of glucose, yeast and liquid paraffin. The factory to vary is the temperature in each experiment Preliminary experiment Method: The apparatus was set up as shown in the diagram below. ...read more.

Conclusion

6 5 6 8 7 10 12 13 45 20 6 5 5 4 5 30 20 6 5 7 7 8 10 11 12 13 13 50 30 11 13 16 12 16 18 14 40 30 37 73 13 23 24 23 22 40 40 35 18 19 21 20 20 28 40 40 4 16 22 19 24 18 16 14 15 50 Conclusion: In conclusion, it can be seen that the most effective temperature for anaerobic respiration to occur is 30 degrees centigrade as this is when the most carbon dioxide is produced. Prediction: Based on the preliminary experiment and background scientific information, I predict that initially, as temperature increases, the amount of respiration will increase also but it will reach a peak at a certain temperature and any temperature increase after that it will result in a decline of the amount of respiration. Ricky Winborn Biology Coursework ...read more.

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