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Investigation on the conductive properties of copper sulphate solution.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jonathan Man

Investigation on the conductive properties of copper sulphate solution.

Aim

I hope to measure the conductivity of copper sulphate solution. I will use a method similar to electrolysis to achieve this. The only difference will be that I am using an alternating current rather than a direct current so that copper from the copper sulphate solution will not be electrolysed.

I chose this topic because I wanted to find out if the conductivity of copper sulphate solution changes with different cross-sectional areas.

Equipment:

Plastic container measuring L=0.13m, W=0.05m, H=0.06m

Copper electrodes X2

Wires

Crocodile clips

AC power supply

Ammeter

Voltmeter

...read more.

Middle

2.00

0.10

0.050

4.00

0.20

0.050

600

0.30

0.050

8.00

0.40

0.050

10.00

0.50

0.050

12.00

0.60

0.050

14.00

0.70

0.050

16.00

0.80

0.050

18.00

0.90

0.050

20.00

1.00

0.050

22.00

1.10

0.050

24.00

1.20

0.050

1 molar copper sulphate solution at the height of 4cm.

Voltage (V)

Current (I)

Conductance (G)

Conductivity (σ)

2.00

0.16        

0.080

4.00

0.32

0.080

6.00

0.48

0.080

8.00

0.64

0.080

10.00

0.80

0.080

12.00

0.96

0.080

14.00

1.12

0.080

16.00

1.28

0.080

18.00

1.44

0.080

20.00

1.60

0.080

22.00

1.76

0.080

24.00

1.92

0.080

0.5 molar copper sulphate solution at the height of 1cm

Voltage (V)

Current (I)

Conductance (G)

Conductivity (σ)

2.00

0.03

0.015

4.00

0.06

0.015

600

0.09

0.015

8.00

0.12

0.015

10.00

0.15

0.015

12.00

0.18

0.015

14.00

0.21

0.015

16.00

0.24

0.015

18.00

0.27

0.015

20.00

0.30

0.015

22.00

0.33

0.015

24.00

0.36

0.015

0.

...read more.

Conclusion

c6">Conductance (G)

Conductivity (σ)

2.00

0.06

0.030

4.00

0.12

0.030

600

0.18

0.030

8.00

0.24

0.030

10.00

0.30

0.030

12.00

0.36

0.030

14.00

0.42

0.030

16.00

0.48

0.030

18.00

0.56

0.030

20.00

0.62

0.030

22.00

0.68

0.030

24.00

0.74

0.030

 0.5 molar copper sulphate solution at the height of 3cm.

Voltage (V)

Current (I)

Conductance (G)

Conductivity (σ)

2.00

0.08

0.040

4.00

0.16

0.040

600

0.24

0.040

8.00

0.32

0.040

10.00

0.40

0.040

12.00

0.48

0.040

14.00

0.56

0.040

16.00

0.64

0.040

18.00

0.72

0.040

20.00

0.80

0.040

22.00

0.88

0.040

24.00

0.96

0.040

0.5 molar copper sulphate solution at the height of 4cm.

Voltage (V)

Current (I)

Conductance (G)

Conductivity (σ)

2.00

0.10

0.050

4.00

0.20

0.050

600

0.30

0.050

8.00

0.40

0.050

10.00

0.50

0.050

12.00

0.60

0.050

14.00

0.70

0.050

16.00

0.80

0.050

18.00

0.90

0.050

20.00

1.00

0.050

22.00

1.10

0.050

24.00

1.20

0.050

...read more.

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