• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Investigation to show how Elastic Bands Behave Under Load.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigation to show how Elastic Bands Behave Under Load

Prediction  

The aim of the investigation is to determine how elastic bands behave under load. Before I begin the investigation I will carry out a preliminary experiment into the behaviour of a spring, which I believe will not act in the same way as the elastic band.

  In the preliminary investigation a spring was put under load and the results were as follows:

Load/g

Length/cm        

Extension/cm

0

2.2        

0

100

11.0

8.8

200

13.1

10.9

300

15.3

13.1

400

17.2

15.0

500

21.1

18.9

600

24.6

22.4

700

29.0

26.8

800

34.3

32.1

900

88.5

36.3

1000

42.0

39.8

1100

46.6

44.4

1200

1300

1400

   From previous knowledge of Hooke's Law, which explains, extension is proportional to load until elastic limit is reached. The preliminary experiment with the spring shows, that they obey Hooke's Law up until the point of permanent deformation (elastic limit).

   I think that the thinner rubber band will have a bigger extension than the thicker band and the longer band will have bigger extension than the shorter band.

  I think the longer rubber band will have the biggest extension because the molecules within the rubber band are larger and are less intertwined and the molecules are therefore stretched further causing it to have a greater extension. Although the band is stretched the rubber band does not obey Hooke's Law. The elastic band will regain its initial shape and it behaves elastically.

...read more.

Middle

500

42.7

34.3

600

46.4

38.0

700

47.6

39.2

800

48.8

40.4

900

51.7

43.3

1000

52.3

43.9

  1. Longer Band

Length = 14.3 cm

Width  = 1 mm

Load/g

Length/cm

Extension/cm

0

14.3

0

100

22.0

7.7

200

35.4

21.1

300

50.3

36.0

400

55.9

41.6

500

64.7

50.4

600

70.8

56.5

700

74.9

60.6

800

78.9

64.6

900

82.3

68.0

1000

84.8

70.5

We repeated our results on this band.

Load/g

Length/cm

Extension/cm

0

15.2

0

100

25.3

10.1

200

42.4

27.2

300

60.6

45.4

400

72.1

56.9

500

77.6

62.4

600

83.7

68.5

700

86.4

71.2

800

89.1

73.9

900

89.9

74.7

1000

94.4

79.2

Changing the width, keeping length the same.

  1. Thicker Band

Length = 6.7 cm

Width = 1 mm

Load/g

Length/cm

Extension/cm

0

6.7

0

100

10.5

3.8

200

12.9

6.2

300

15.7

9.0

400

19.6

12.9

500

23.8

17.1

600

29.1

22.4

700

32.2

25.5

800

35.9

29.2

900

38.5

31.8

1000

43.0

36.3

...read more.

Conclusion

  The conclusions I have made are true for all elastic bands I measured. I would have to experiment further with different elastic bands to prove that my conclusions were true. I couldn’t say for sure what would happen to other elastic bands of different lengths and widths, as it would have to be investigated further. I also could measure an elastic band to a certain length or width to see if my conclusions are true.

  If I were to do the experiment again I would look at other materials to stretch such as copper, steel, rubber etc to see if any other materials obey Hooke’s Law. I could again look at different lengths and widths of other elastic bands.

  I would also use accurate measuring equipment so that no errors occur and good, clear accurate results are obtained. The good results would present a clear idea of how elastic bands behave under load. Further experiments could be carried out, using different equipment to see if my conclusions are true that elastic bands do not obey Hooke’s Law.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Waves & Cosmology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Waves & Cosmology essays

  1. Hooke's Law.

    This should be carried on until the weights can no longer be attached to the hanging spring. APPARATUS The apparatus that I shall need set up for my experiment consist of the following items: 1. Retort Stands (x 2) 2.

  2. Does a rubber band obey Hooke's law?

    that rubber was an 'exception' Evaluation Evaluation: My conclusion is the same as my prediction and also my scientific knowledge stated that a rubber band would not obey Hooke's law In my investigation I did the following to make sure my experiment was a fair test: * I made sure that I kept the same rubber band.

  1. Stretching Rubber Bands

    * Rubber bands are handled carefully * Mirrors are handled carefully Plan Set up the apparatus as shown in the diagram below: - I did some preliminary work to use a thin rubber band, as the thick band did not extend enough to obtain good results.

  2. Does an elastic band behave in the same way as a steel spring?

    My graph has shown that an elastic band does not react in the same way as a steel spring because when stretched both react differently. A steel spring keeps its original shape and its extension is proportional to its load obeying Hooke's law.

  1. Investigate the way in which extension depends on the tension for rubber.

    Place your tray or box directly below the stand. From the stand use a clamp to allow a nail to stick out from the stand. Hang an elastic band from this nail. The weights should be on a separate stand which it self weighs either 10g or 100g, depending on which one you use.

  2. An experiment to investigate and determine how rubber behaves when tension forces are applied ...

    The deforming force may be applied to a solid by stretching, compressing, squeezing, bending, or twisting. So a rubber band exhibits elastic behaviour according to Hooke's law because the small increase in its length when stretched by an applied force doubles each time the force is doubled.

  1. Investigate the effects of how springs and elastic bands stretch when weights are hung ...

    clamp so I could measure the distance that the spring had gone down and stretched. Obviously the more weight we put on the further the spring went down. I placed the spring on the clamp and measured the starting point of the spring on the ruler and marked it with a removable pen.

  2. Stretching Springs/Hookes Law.

    This relationship is known as Hooke's Law after the British physicist Robert Hooke, who first expressed it. However, if the external force is too strong, the material can become permanently deformed, and Hooke's Law no longer applies. The maximum amount of stress a material can withstand before becoming permanently deformed is called the elastic limit.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work