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Mitochondria & Chloroplast

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Introduction

Mitochondrion Chloroplast Similarity Main power source of the organism Double membrane, and intermembrane space. Contain DNA and RNA, which are involved with the synthesis of the membrane and enzyme proteins, when the organelles replicate during cell division. Contain 70s ribosomes. Contain similar enzymes and coenzymes Both are involved in ATP production via a proton gradient (across the thylakoid membrane of chloroplast, across the cristae for mitochondria) Have ATP-synthatases appearing as stalked particles (on the thylakoid membrane of chloroplast, on the cristae of mitochondria) ...read more.

Middle

to make sugar (glucose) Complex substances (sugar) are broken down into simpler ones. Complex substances (sugar) are formed from simpler ones. Krebs cycle Calvin cycle Compare chloroplast and mitochondria Chloroplast can only be found in plants, while mitochondria can be found in not only plants but also in animals. They have some similarities like: they both have double membrane and intermembrane space; Contain DNA and RNA, which are involved with the synthesis of the membrane and enzyme proteins, when the organelles replicate during cell division. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, they are still different in their structures: Chloroplast is usually coloured as it contains thylakoid membranes and pigment molecules but a mitochondrium is hardly found in coloured because there is no pigment in it. The liquid part inside chloroplast is called "stroma" but in mitochondria is "matrix". Despite both being the main power supplies for organisms, each of them function differently. Chloroplasts are involved in photosynthesis - they require energy from light to make sugar (glucose) (stored) from simpler substance through Calvin cycle. Mitochondria are involved in respiration - energy (ATP) is released by breaking down glucose - Complex substances (sugar) are broken down into simpler ones - through Krebs cycle. ...read more.

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Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

This is a piece used for classwork. It is explained in good detail and compares the structure and function of a chloroplast and ribosome well. The only thing lacking is greater scientific detail in some parts.

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Response to the question

This is a piece used for classwork. It is explained in good detail and compares the structure and function of a chloroplast and ribosome well. The only thing lacking is greater scientific detail in some parts.

Level of analysis

The pictures used help the reader to easily see any similarities or difference in structure of the organelle. This seems more like revision notes or a piece of class work, but would be useful for a range of exam boards. The table format used is very good and clearly presents the information. The scientific terms used are very accurate. The points made are very good. The diagrams used to display krebs cycle and the calvin cycle could be better explained if they were accompanied by bullet points.

Quality of writing

Uses short hand format which is adequate for a table but some of the points lack. punctuation throughout. The spelling and grammar otherwise are fine and easy to read. Should not have blank table spaces towards the end of the table as this just looks untidy.


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Reviewed by skatealexia 07/07/2012

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