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My aim is to investigate what factors affect the period of a Baby Bouncer. The factor that I will be varying will be the mass on the end of the spring.

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Introduction

Edward Amoroso                            Physics Coursework July 2003                                      

GCSE Physics Coursework

Aim

My aim is to investigate what factors affect the period of a Baby Bouncer. The factor that I will be varying will be the mass on the end of the spring.

Hypothesis

Hooke’s law occurs in springs. The further you stretch the spring, the greater the force is opposing the stretching. Therefore, the force increases with distance. The equation for Hooke’s law is:F= -kx. F is the force applied to stretch or compress the spring, x is the distance the spring is stretched or compressed and k is the "spring constant". It basically says that the response of a spring is proportional to the force, and when the force is removed, the spring will go back to its original shape.

Prediction

I predict that as the mass of the baby is increased, the period of the oscillation will also be increased.

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Middle

2.63

300

3.33

3.39

3.37

3.37

3.13

3.32

400

3.79

3.92

3.63

3.96

4.02

3.86

500

4.14

4.27

4.27

4.34

4.38

4.28

600

5.08

4.83

4.85

4.82

4.83

4.83

700

4.92

5.19

5.04

5.09

5.28

5.1

800

5.47

5.43

5.32

5.58

5.45

5.45

900

5.66

5.7

5.78

6.01

5.86

5.8

1000

6.06

6.03

6.04

6.08

6.03

6.05

For 1 oscillation

Time taken for 1 oscillation in seconds

Mass of weight in grams

Repeat 1

Repeat 2

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Conclusion

Evaluation

The experiment went well, and in the end, our results matched our prediction. The results were mainly good, and I can only spot one major anomaly, which is highlighted in blue. Although this result was an anomaly, it did not show up on the graphs. This is because we took an average on the graphs, and the rest of the results leveled the anomaly out when we took the average. The anomaly could have been there because the stopwatch was started slightly later, or maybe because the weights were swaying slightly. We could see from the results that as the force was increased, the period of an oscillation was increased. The spring did not reach its elastic limits in our experiment, as, after all of the results were taken, the spring was still at the same size as it was originally. The experiment was a success because only one variable was changed. Only the mass on the end of the spring is changed, because otherwise the results would have been more random.

...read more.

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