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Osmosis in plant tissue.

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Introduction

Osmosis in plant tissue Introduction In this experiment I am going to find the water potential of a chip, by immersing it in different concentrations of sucrose solutions using the theory of osmosis, the gain or loss in length of the chip can be measured, in osmosis water molecules move down a gradient from a concentrated area to an area where they are less concentrated. In the first half of the experiment, half an hour should be sufficient to find the water potential of the chip. The process of this is also known as graded osmotion and the chip will shrink due to plasmolysis of cells. The equipment that I needed for this experiment is as follows Equipment: 5 petri dishes Sucrose Distilled water to make up the sucrose solution 10 chips cut up to be 40 millemetres in length Paper towel to mop up spills Ruler to measure chips My ...read more.

Middle

had pre-labeled 0.0 for pure water 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.0 for pure sucrose, this is when the water is completely saturated and can hold no more sugar. Afterwards, I cut up 10 chips to the measurement of 40 millemetres in length and immersed two in each of the petri-dishes containing the different concentrations of sucrose soulution. Aim: My aim in this experiment is to find the water potential of a chip and to test test the theory of osmosis to see if I can produce accurate results and have an accurate prediction . Safety rules: Although this is a safe experiment and spills would be harmless, like any experiments there are still safety aspects to take into account these include taking care when cutting the chips and wearing safety goggles just in case anything may go into ones eyes. ...read more.

Conclusion

1.0 40mm 49mm 49mm 49mm 9mm Table showing substance concentration: conc/mol water/cm2 Sucrose 1 mol solution 1.0 0 30.00 0.8 6 24.00 0.4 12 18.00 0.2 24 6.00 0.0 30 0 conclusion: In this experiment my prediction was correct and I am satisfied that this experiment was carried out faierly concluding that thuis was a fair test, there is a few observations which i could have done to aid the accuracy of this experiment, e.g. the concentration of the sucrose in water went as follows, 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.0 to aid the accuracy i could have added 0.6 in between 0.6, this is not that importanty though as the results show it is fairly accurate what has happened to the cells is shown in the following diagrams These two diagrams show a deplasmalized cell and a turgid cell. The dseplazmalizeds is beforer osmosis and the turgid cell is after osmosis. ...read more.

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