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Rennin. I am going to investigate the changes that will happen if a different amount of rennin is used each time. I predict that if more rennin is used the milk will clot faster.

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Introduction

Rennin Introduction To alter the speed at which rennin will clot milk the following variables could be changed: the temperature, amount of rennin, the pH, the amount of milk, the type of milk. I am going to investigate the changes that will happen if a different amount of rennin is used each time. I predict that if more rennin is used the milk will clot faster. Enzymes are large proteins that speed up chemical reactions. They act as catalysts to regulate the speed of chemical reactions in living organisms. A small number of amino acids are brought together to form the active site, or the location on the enzyme where the substrate binds and the reaction takes place. The enzyme and the substrate will not bind if their shapes do not match exactly. This ensures that the enzyme does not participate in the wrong reaction. The enzyme itself is unaffected by the reaction. When the products have been released, the enzyme is ready to bind with a new substrate. ...read more.

Middle

Also the same temperature was maintained throughout the experiment, which was 37� Celsius. This temperature was chosen because it is body temperature and rennin works fastest and best at this temperature. Before the experiment was carried out, some preliminary practical work had to be carried out to see approximately how long the rennin took to clot the milk so that I could decide what amounts of rennin to use. To do the preliminary work I put 0.1 ml of rennin into a test tube and added 2cm� of milk. It took 340 seconds for the milk to clot and it seemed a reasonable time so the I put 0.5 ml of rennin into a test tube with 2cm� of milk to see how fast the differences were and to determine whether I should increase the amount of rennin in gaps of 0.1mls or in 0.2mls. It took 65 seconds for the milk to clot with 0.5ml of rennin added to it so I decided to leave a gap of 0.1 ml between each amount of rennin added. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think that the reason for this may have been because the amounts I was investigating were well spaced out so the results were not really close enough to become out of order and maybe if I had investigated the amount rennin every 0.05mls then some of them may not have been quite in-keeping with the rest. To improve the experiment I could investigate a wider range of quantities of rennin perhaps from 0.1ml up to 1ml or further so that I could see if the time taken for the milk to clot actually went down after a while. I could also do a more detailed experiment, for example, leaving gaps of 0.05mls between each amount of rennin. To support my conclusion I could test the different amounts of rennin while the experiment was set up at the pH value of the stomach, which is about pH 2, to improve the speed that was taken for the milk to clot. ...read more.

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