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The aim of this experiment is to measure how the resistance change as the factors change

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Factors which effect the resistance of a wire

Planning

Aim:

The aim of this experiment is to measure how the resistance change as the factors change. There are so many variables—temperature of surroundings, length, thickness, material, temperature of the wire, surface area, magnetic properties, coated or not and purity—that can be chosen to measure in this experiment. But in this experiment I am only going to measure two of them, which are length and thickness because these two are the easiest to measure and show the effects on the resistance.

Prediction:

The result should be showing that the resistance increase as the length or thickness increase. This happens because when length or thickness increases, the current will decrease. As the voltage won’t change, if the current decreases, then the resistance will increase.

Method:

In the experiment I will need to use apparatus listed below.

  • Copper wires with different length
  • Copper wires with different thickness
  • Connection wires
  • Voltmeter
  • Ammeter
  • Electricity supply or battery
  • Variable resistor
...read more.

Middle

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.17

0.02

0.34

0.03

0.48

0.04

0.54

0.05

0.66

36 SWG(0.20 mm), 5 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.27

0.02

0.47

0.03

0.72

0.04

1.00

0.05

1.14

36 SWG(0.20 mm), 1 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.40

0.02

0.66

0.03

0.90

0.04

1.30

0.05

1.78

20 SWG(0.90 mm), 20 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.17

0.02

0.20

0.03

0.23

0.04

0.30

0.05

0.39

20 SWG(0.90 mm), 15 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.34

0.02

0.70

0.03

1.03

0.04

1.30

0.05

1.57

20 SWG(0.90 mm), 10 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.35

0.02

0.58

0.03

0.77

0.04

1.00

0.05

1.15

20 SWG(0.90 mm), 5 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

1.17

0.02

1.79

0.03

2.92

0.04

3.50

0.05

3.60

20 SWG(0.90 mm), 1 cm

Voltage, V/Volts, V

Current, I/Amps, A

0.01

0.85

0.02

1.27

0.03

2.08

0.04

2.80

0.05

3.27

26 SWG(0.

...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluating

Although the whole experiment has been going very well, but the results seems to show some bias or errors as in one or two of the graphs, the pattern is quite strange because some of the gradient (resistance) is not proportional to the lengths. Overall, the experiment can be said as a success.

Michael Li

...read more.

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