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The digestive system

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Introduction

THE DIGESTIVE SYSYTEM What are the five basic activities of the digestive system? The five basic activities of the digestive system are ingestion, digestion, absorption, assimilation and egestion. How does the digestive system work? Food enters the (1) mouth, which contains salivary glands that produces a carbohydrase enzyme called salivary amylase. The food is transported down the oesophagus (2) to the stomach (3), which pummels the food with its muscular walls; it produces the protease enzyme and hydrochloric acid to kill bacteria and to give the right pH for the protease enzyme to work. (pH 2) - acidic. In the liver (4) bile is produced which emulsifies fats and neutralises stomach acid making the conditions right for the enzymes in the small intestine. Bile is produced in the gall bladder. (5) The pancreas (6) produces all three-enzyme protease, carbohydrase and lipase. Leaving the pancreas food continues on into the small intestine (7) also producing carbohyrase, protease and lipase. ...read more.

Middle

Sugars, amino acids and fatty acid/ glycerol are much smaller molecules, which can pass easily in to the blood. Enzymes act as catalysts to break down the big molecules into smaller ones. Carbohdrase is produced in three different places: The salivary glands, the pancreas and the small intestines. This converts starch into simple sugars like glucose or maltose etc. Protease is produced in three different places: The stomach, the pancreas and the small intestine. This converts proteins into amino acids. Lipase is produced in two different places: The pancreas and the small intestine. This converts fats into fatty acids and glycerol. Bile is produced in the liver to neutralise the stomach acid and emulsifies fats. List and briefly describe at least 8 functions of the liver. 1. Production of bile. 2. Deamination of surplus amino acids. 3. Regulation of blood sugar by interconversion of glucose and glycogen. ...read more.

Conclusion

Describe the link between the digestive system and conditions such as asthma, migraine and uticaria. Regarding the mucous, which is produced by the digestive system, too much can accumulate around the bronchioles and cause a constriction of your breathing, which leads to asthma. Allergic conditions in the digestive system which produce inflammation in the intestinal tract can be the cause of a migraine because it can affect the blood and nerve activity. Urticaria is a condition in which red, itchy and swollen areas appear on the skin. Usually as an allergic reaction from eating certain foods or taking certain medicines. Name 3 conditions effecting digestion. What help can an aromatherapist offer in regard to helping these conditions? Bergamot stimulates the production of gastric juices, tone the stomach and aids digestion. Therefore it is good for dyspepsia. Bergamot also relaxes the muscles of the digestive tract and can relieve constipation. Rosemary stimulates the production of gastric juices and bile therefore it can be used to treat liver infections. ...read more.

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