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The effect of amylase concentration on the breakdown of starch

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Introduction

The effect of amylase concentration on the breakdown of starch This Essay was awarded a mark of A, so they say. Only the plan is included For this investigation I am going to investigate the effect of the concentration of an enzyme, in this case Amylase, on the time taken for the enzyme to fully breakdown the substrate, which in this case is starch. The reason why these two enzymes have to be used is because each enzyme is designed specifically to break down only one substrate as each enzyme is made of a protein that causes it to be a specific shape, in this case the enzyme Amylase can only break down starch to dextrin. I am going to do this by planning an experiment, carrying out the experiment, recording any relevant results and plotting graphs from which I will be able, hopefully to gain a strong conclusion. I will finally evaluate the whole investigation. Before the experiments start we will be given a bottle containing a 1% solution of starch and another bottle containing a 1% solution of the enzyme Amylase. From these bottles I will be able to take out as much of either solution as I wish. I cannot start he experiment until I know which factors I am going to change and which I am going to keep constant. ...read more.

Middle

3 x 10ml syringe Used for very accurate measuring of both the amylase, starch solution and water. This will be vital for getting the correct volume of the 3 substances into the test tubes. Thermometer The most accurate way of measuring the temperature of the water bath and therefore the temperature of the enzyme (see earlier) and substrate. Stopwatch accurate To measure accurately the time to 10th of a second it takes for each concentration of amylase to break down the starch. 250ml beaker Used for the water bath because it is large enough to hold the water, 2 test tubes and the thermometer at the same time. It also conducts heat well. Bunsen burner, heat Used as a unit to heat the Proof mat, tripod water bath. Test tube rack To hold the test tubes before Tongues and after the reaction has been carried out. Iodine solution in To test for the starch as potassium iodide iodine turns from a reddish With dropper. orange to purple black if starch is present. (See later). Pipette Used to take a tiny amount of the solution out of the test tube during the time when the enzyme will be breaking down the starch. Making the amylase concentrations As the amylase solution that is given is already at 1% I will not be able to concentrate the solution any higher without high difficulty for this reason I have decided to lower the concentration of the enzyme to my desired levels. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reason for using the water bath is to make sure that the solutions for all the experiments are at the same temperature. If I did not use the water bath they may differ as a different area of the room may be different to another area or as the practical will be carried out over a number of different days if one day is warmer or colder than the other there may be quite a temperature range. I have used the range of concentrations (0.2% etc) because when I come to plot a graph of the results a wider range of readings will mean that the graph will show any pattern better and I have used 3 readings so a better average can be gained again making for a better more accurate graph from which my analysis can be based. The graph I will be plotting will be of concentration of amylase against time taken for the starch to be broken down. I believe that the graph will show that as the enzyme concentration increases the time taken decreases. Safety aspects Goggles must be worn and especially while using the iodine as it can be irritable to the eyes. Stand up while using the Bunsen burner so you can move away quickly should the water bath fall. Any long hair tied back to keep out of way of flames ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

***This report contains a suggested plan for the experiment only.
The rationale for the investigation was discussed but there was little background research and no resource material used. A testable hypothesis was produced and biological knowledge used to explain the prediction. There was some attention to detail in the way variables were controlled but not all were controlled appropriately. The risk assessment was minimal .

Marked by teacher Stevie Fleming 01/01/1970

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