• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The effect of enzyme concentration on the rate of an enzymic controlled reaction.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

AS Level Biology Practical Skills Assessment Eloise Tarling The effect of enzyme concentration on the rate of an enzymic controlled reaction. The effect of enzyme concentration on the rate of an enzymic controlled reaction. Enzymes are protein molecules, which can be defined as Biological catalysts, which alter the rate of a reaction without the enzymes undergoing change themselves. Enzymes are usually specific to one singular reaction. Enzymes are globular proteins with the helix coiled into a precise three-dimensional tertiary structure, with Hydrophilic R groups held by four different types of bonds: 1. Hydrogen 2. Disulphide 3. Ionic 4. Hydrophilic / Hydrophobic Enzymes possess an active site, a region, usually a cleft or depression to which another molecule can bind. This specific molecule is the enzymes' substrate. The precise shape of the active site allows the substrate to bind perfectly to the active site. ...read more.

Middle

When investigating the effect of enzyme concentration it is fairest to look at initial rate of reaction, as once the reaction is underway, the amount of substrate available in the reaction begins to vary, as substrate is converted to products at different rates, all depending upon concentration. When the Enzyme-Substrate Complex is initially formed, there are a large number of substrate molecules available, meaning every enzyme molecule has a substrate molecule in its active site. This allows for the V Max rate of reaction, V Max being where the enzyme is working at its maximum possible rate. Rate of reaction depends upon the number of enzyme molecules available, and the speed at which the enzyme molecules convert substrate molecules into products. As the reaction continues, there are gradually fewer substrate molecules, meaning the speed of the reaction will decrease until the reaction eventually ceases. ...read more.

Conclusion

* The lower the enzyme concentration, the slower the rate of the reaction. During this investigation, I will be controlling the following variables: * Temperature (consistent at 40 C). * Time of recording results (every 30 seconds for 5 minutes, including a reading at 0). Prior to this investigation, I carried out the experiment that I will be using for my practical assessment to familiarise myself with the method. However, in my preliminary experiment, I focussed upon identifying the course of an enzyme-controlled reaction. For this investigation, I will be altering the concentrations of enzyme, temperatures, and times of recording results, from those used in my preliminary experiment. I will be using 5 different enzyme concentrations, opposed to the single concentration included in the preliminary experiment, and I will be concentrating upon one particular temperature, being 40 C. In order ensure the validity of my experiment; I will take three recording of each enzyme concentration at 40 C, instead of one, as in my preliminary experiment. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Molecules & Cells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Molecules & Cells essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Following the Progress of an Enzyme Controlled Reaction

    4 star(s)

    Other enzymes into molecules of glucose, which are rapidly absorbed through the intestinal wall, ultimately break down the by-products of Amylase hydrolysis. Beta-Amylases are present in yeasts, molds, bacteria, and plants, particularly in the seeds. They are the principal components of a mixture called diastase that is used in the

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Beetroot Practical Write up

    3 star(s)

    beetroots from the boiling tubes * Using a colourimeter, set up by placing complementary green light filter into the designated position * Fill a cuvette of distilled water and place into the colourimeter with the clear sides facing the reader and the ridged edges facing the sides * By using

  1. An Investigation into the effect of varying enzyme concentration on the rate of an ...

    This increases the chances of them hitting each other. Between 5� and 40�C the rate of reaction doubles for every 10�C rise in the temperature. The optimum temperature for enzymes to work at is human body temperature, which is around 37�C.

  2. WHAT EFFECT DOES SUBSTRATE HAVE ON THE RATE OF RESPIRATION IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE?

    Therefore they move much faster hence, the rate of diffusion is quicker. If a membrane is involved, the particles collide with the membrane more often thus being transported across it by carrier proteins much faster, causing an increase in the rate of diffusion.

  1. Catalyse Investigation

    � In this investigation each reading was repeated so that an average rate of reaction for each enzyme concentration could be calculated. This could be improved by repeating the reading more frequently thus reducing the extent of any anomalies further, once averaged.

  2. Should homeopathy be available on the NHS?

    Aside from this, there is a high percentage of results that have concluded in statistically non-conclusive. However, this is only true for the control group, using a placebo. For the control group which uses a medical device other than the placebo this is not the case.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work