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The Effect of Increasing the Amount of Glucose on the Rising of Dough.

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Introduction

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING THE AMOUNT OF GLUCOSE ON THE RISING OF DOUGH Plan: - In order to create a fair test, it is important that we only vary one variable while keeping the other variables constant. The continuous variables within this practical include - The amount of yeast and also type The amount of water The amount of flour The amount of glucose The length of time the dough is allowed to rise The temperature at which the experiment is warmed at As we have found, it would be difficult to practically set up an investigation of varying the temperature, so because of this I chose to vary the mass of glucose used. Because I am varying the mass of the glucose, it is necessary to kept the experiment a fair test and ensure the other variables are kept constant. In the experiment, I predict that yeast cells (a single cell fungus plant) will consume the raw material supplied to it (glucose - the energy source) to release ethanol and carbon dioxide while producing the energy by fermentation. This is because of the equation - The yeast cells allow the glucose to be diffused through the yeast's cell membrane resulting the glucose to become absorbed by enzymes and then it treats it as the energy source to respire. Because of this fact, I predict that having larger amounts of glucose will mean that there will be more collisions between the yeast cells and the glucose molecules allowing it to be absorbed, creating a larger rise in the dough. ...read more.

Middle

(cm): 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.2 1.3 1.1 1.9 1.8 2.1 1.5 1.6 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.5 1.3 1.6 2.2 2.4 2.4 0.7 1.2 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 3.0 2.9 3.2 1.9 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.1 1.9 Average:- 1.69 Mass of glucose added to dough: 1.00g Rise of Dough (cm): 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.6 1.8 2.1 2.2 1.5 1.7 1.7 2.6 2.5 2.0 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.3 1.3 1.5 2.3 2.0 2.5 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.8 2.0 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.2 Average:- 1.84 Mass of glucose added to dough: 1.25g Rise of Dough (cm): 1.9 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.8 2.4 1.8 1.9 1.8 2.5 2.6 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.1 1.6 1.5 1.6 2.8 2.6 2.8 0.7 0.9 0.7 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.6 3.7 3.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.3 2.3 2.4 Average:- 1.96 x This represents that this data was collected by myself Graph: - Analysis: - In the graph above we can see that when more glucose is added there is more rise in the dough. As I had predicted, as we added more glucose, the rate of rise increased because the glucose was the fuel of the yeast, so with more glucose there was a higher rise in the dough. I predict that having larger masses of glucose will mean that there will be more collisions between the yeast cells and the glucose molecules allowing it to be absorbed, creating a larger rise in the dough. ...read more.

Conclusion

Other improvement could include when adding water to the yeast to create dough, that it be pre-heated ideally at 40C so when the test tube was placed into the water-bath, the temperature would correctly be about the same so making the experiment even fairer. We could also investigate adding glucose but with higher masses to see whether or not the curve actually levels out, this will help me to see the broad effect of glucose on the rise of dough. Also we could make sure that the yeast cells themselves have depleted their contained energy source within them and so see whether or not the graph of this experiment would be similar to my graph prediction in this experiment - that the best-fit line went through the origin. We could also investigate the other variables in the experiment such as the effect of adding more yeast to the dough and seeing the rise of it or vary the yeast type and see the effect this has on the rise. We could even vary the flour to see what affect if any this has on the rise of dough. All of these suggestions will allow us to extend our own knowledge about how yeast cell depend on other requirements such as glucose to be able to produce carbon dioxide for the dough to rise. Biology Coursework - The effect of increasing the amount of glucose on the rising of dough - ...read more.

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