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The effect of substrate of yeast fermentation and its respiration rate

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Introduction

The effect of substrate of yeast fermentation and its respiration rate. Aim: The aim is to measure the amount of carbon dioxide bubbles produced by three different respiratory substrates; glucose, sucrose and starch that are acted upon by yeast. To determine, which substrate produces the most amount of bubbles. I will carry out this experiment by reacting yeast with the three different respiratory substrates at constant temperature, pH, mass, volume and other variables and I will measure the rate of respiration. I will add each respiratory substrate sugars with yeast and that will produce alcohol, carbon dioxide and energy and I will measure the rate at which most bubbles are produced for each sugar. Yeast + Respiratory Substrate Bubbles (CO2) + Alcohol + Energy Prediction: I predict that when glucose reacts with yeast it will produce most amount of bubbling than sucrose and starch and therefore the rate of respiration of glucose with yeast will be higher than with sucrose and glucose. ...read more.

Middle

Starch is a polysaccharide which consists of many units of glucose linked together by a glycosidic bond. It is a long chain of molecules and branched molecules. * This is a polysaccharide which has many units of glucose linked together. It is a very compact structure therefore hard to breakdown. It is difficult to break down all these glycosidic bonds and the structure is very compact. Therefore starch will have the lowest rate of respiration and will produce least amount of bubbles. Glucose is a simple molecule, a monosaccharide so it is easy to break down and therefore it will have the highest rate of respiration. Alcohol will be produced much quicker and more bubbling will be recorded. Equipment: * Respiratory substrates (glucose, sucrose, starch) * Yeast * Distilled water * Measuring cylinder * 3 Test tubes * 100 cm� beakers * 100 cm� syringe * 100 cm� measuring cylinder * flask * cork stopper with tube * rod to stir * water bath * weighing scale * weighing boat * cork stopper * 250 cm� flask * gloves * lab coat Method: * Get all the equipment ready. ...read more.

Conclusion

Place the flask in the water bath with set temperature of 37�C for 10 minutes. Then as the bubbling starts immediately place the cork stopper onto the flask. Measure the volume of gas produced. * Repeat the same procedure for test tubes B and C. * Repeat the same procedure for sucrose and starch. * Take the readings. Fair test: To ensure that the experiment is fair there are certain variables that must be kept constant. Temperature and pH must be constant in order to obtain accurate results. To keep the temperature constant I will use the water bath to maintain the temperature of 37�C as this is the optimum temperature for the enzymes to work at its best. I will use the buffer solution to monitor the pH value. I will ensure that I use the same measuring cylinder and same volume of yeast and sugars to maintain the accuracy. I will repeat the experiment three times for each sugar to increase the degree of accuracy. Resources: http://www.scientificpsychic.com/fitness/carbohydrates.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucrose http://www.scientificpsychic.com/fitness/carbohydrates1.html Essential AS Biology for OCR, Glenn and Susan Toole, nelson thornes pages; 28, 30. 1 ...read more.

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