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The Oscillation Of A Spring.

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Introduction

image00.png

The Oscillation Of A Spring

Idea:

My investigation is to find the relationship between the size of one oscillation of a spring, and the length of the spring, which will be determined by various masses being attached to the end of the spring as shown in the diagram below. During the course of the experiment, there will be three controlled variables. These are (a) - the spring size

(b) - the clamp, stand, and vice

(c) - the number of times the spring oscillates

The independent variable in this experiment will be the different masses and my two dependant variables are

(a) – the speed of the oscillation

(b) – the energy of the oscillation

Diagram:

When set up, the apparatus being used should look like this:

image06.png

Method:

        Set up a clamp and stand and secure the stand with a vice to reduce vibration and movement of the stand. Attach the clamp as low down to the table as possible to ensure that there is less vibration still and suspend the spring over the edge of the table on the ‘mouth’ of the clamp. Attach a mass to the bottom of the spring and measure the displacement. Place a pointer 10cm under the new length of the spring. Pull the spring down to the pointer and time how long it takes for the spring to oscillate ten times. Replace the mass and repeat the experiment. Do this for each mass.

...read more.

Middle

  1. – The spring’s elastic limit – The spring cannot be overstretched for two reasons. These are:

I - If it is pulled too far, the oscillations would be uneven, unsteady and would be difficult to record, and

II – If the spring goes past its elastic limit, it wouldn’t work properly and would eventually be just a piece or wire.

     (b) – The way the spring is attached to the clamp – This is important because lalalal if the spring is not self-suspended, it could affect the size, number, and  lallala speed of each individual oscillation.

Results:

First Set Of Results

Weight On Spring

(g)

Spring Length

(cm)

Spring In Equilibrium

(cm)

Time Taken

(1 Oscillation)

(Seconds)

100

2.3

6.5

0.38

200

2.3

10.2

0.54

300

2.3

15.1

0.67

400

2.3

18.4

0.77

500

2.3

22.7

0.88

600

2.3

26.3

0.90

700

2.3

30.6

0.94

800

2.3

34.4

0.99

900

2.3

37.3

1.04

1000

2.3

42.1

1.11

Second Set Of Results

Weight On Spring

(g)

Spring Length

(cm)

Spring In Equilibrium

(cm)

Time Taken

(1 Oscillation)

(Seconds)

100

2.2

5

0.38

200

2.2

8.5

0.48

300

2.2

11.9

0.56

400

2.2

15.5

0.64

500

2.2

18.2

0.76

600

2.2

22.4

0.82

700

2.2

26.3

0.89

800

2.2

29.4

0.97

900

2.2

32.5

1.04

1000

2.2

35.3

1.14

...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation:

        Overall, I think my experiment was carried out quite well, and I managed to get fairly accurate results too. I do however think that I could’ve done better in several ways.

The first thing I would change about the way in which I did my experiment would be to carry out more preliminary tests. For one, this would increase the way in which I carried out my experiment, and two, this would give me more information on the spring that I could use. For example if I had tested to see if there was an effect on the oscillations if the spring was displaced upwards instead of down to begin with.

The second is by increasing the number of recordings taken. In doing this, my experiment would’ve been more accurate due to the fact that I’d have more results to look at.

The next thing I could’ve done was to use 50g weights instead of 100g. This would also improve my results as they would be closer together and it would be easier to point out any anomalies that may have occurred.

The last thing I could’ve done would be to amend my graphs. So, instead of drawing a line of best fit, I could’ve drawn a curve of best fit instead, seeing as the graph itself was in the shape of a curve. Not only would this have been easier to look at and analyse, but it would reduce the number of anomalies created.

...read more.

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