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To investigate the optimum concentration of an enzyme in an enzyme controlled reaction

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Introduction

Enzyme Investigation Aim: To investigate the optimum concentration of an enzyme in an enzyme controlled reaction. Prediction: We are going to use Catalase enzyme which speeds up the decomposition of a poisonous chemical called Hydrogen Peroxide into Water and Oxygen. Catalase is found in the cytoplasm of all cells. We have decided to use catalase because we have used it in a previous experiment and it gives clear measurable results. Our tissue source is celery we have used this in previous experiments. We have to use a tissue source because catalase is an intracellular enzyme. Hydrogen peroxide can be made accidentally in the cytoplasm of cells from water and oxygen. The reaction between catalase and Hydrogen Peroxide is Catabolic. Catabolic reactions break down large molecules into smaller ones. The enzyme joins up with the substrate like a lock and key. The enzyme then breaks the substrate into two substances, which are oxygen and water. Below is how I predict my graph to look. It shows the relationship between the optimum concentration and the rate of reaction. I cannot predict the optimum concentration because this is what I am trying to find. My graph can be divided into two sections the first is the curved region. ...read more.

Middle

We placed different amounts of Catalase in a measuring cylinder with Hydrogen Peroxide and measured the amount of foam produced. We measured the foam to give us a guide but this was too inaccurate to use in our main investigation. We decided to use 10ml of Hydrogen Peroxide and 10ml of Catalase this is our 100% concentration. We will dilute the Catalase enzyme. We will measure the amount of oxygen in 60 seconds it gives us a large volume of oxygen and allows us to be precise Method: Burette Boiling tube Delivery tube Bung Shringe Measuring Cylinder Trough Stand Clamp Stopclock We set up the apparatus as above. We filled the trough and burette up with water making sure that the burette was totally full we then turned it upside down and placed the end into the trough. We placed the end of the delivery tube under the burette. We then got 10ml of Hydrogen Peroxide and placed it into a boiling tube. We measured out 4ml of catalase using a shringe to be accurate and then placed this in a measuring cylinder then we added 6ml of distilled water and mixed them together. This is the 40% concentration. Although the celery contained water, we used it as our 100%. ...read more.

Conclusion

again as they did not fit in with the other results I did not include them in any other of my calculations Conclusion: My graph shows the relationship between the concentration of enzyme and the rate of reaction. The rate of reaction is the amount of oxygen given off from the reaction in 60 seconds. From my narrow range graph, you can see that the optimum concentration of this reaction is 95%. I have included some detailed information about this particular reaction in my prediction. This can be found on page 1. My prediction graph agrees with my final graph. The first part of the graph is an upward slope. It shows that as the temperature rises so does the amount of oxygen given off. This is what I had predicted. The flat region of my graph shows that the enzyme is the same amount as substrate and the reaction is at its optimum or highest rate. No matter how much more enzyme is added there will be no more oxygen produced because there is not enough substrate. I could not have predicted the optimum concentration because that was the aim of the experiment although I would have expected it to be lower. However, because we used celery this contains water, which would mean that the enzyme had been diluted. 1 1 ...read more.

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