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Various Factors in the Preparation and cooking of Fruit and Vegetables can change the Vitamin C content. Devise and experiment one of those factors.

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Introduction

Various Factors in the Preparation and cooking of Fruit and Vegetables can change the Vitamin C content. Devise and experiment one of those factors. Pilot Method 1. Use a syringe (or Measuring Cylinder for measuring equal amounts) and pour out 10ml of DCPIP (Solution used to detect Vit.C) into a small beaker. 2. Using a separate Syringe, draw up 10ml of solution 0.1% Vitamin C 3. Slowly add the Vit.C into the DCPIP solution beaker, swirling around a few times. (swirling helps solutions to mix) 4. Continue to add the Vit.C until DCPIP turns a permanent straw colour. 5. Note the amount of Vit.C it took to change the colour of the DCPIP. 6. Repeat steps 1-5 5 3 times and take an average. Pilot Results Strength of DCPIP X Volume = Volume of Vit.C x Strength )( x 10ml = 8.5ml x 0.1% )( = 6ml x 0.1% 10ml Strength of DCPIP = 0.06 Strength of DCPIP X Volume = Volume of Vit.C x Strength )( x 10ml = 6ml x 0.1% )( = 6ml x 0.1% 10ml Strength of DCPIP = 0.06 Strength of DCPIP X Volume = Volume of Vit.C x Strength )( x 10ml = 6ml x 0.1% )( = 6ml x 0.1% 10ml Strength of DCPIP = 0.06 Average Strength of DCPIP = 0.06 Method 1. ...read more.

Middle

Compared with the other Juices (excluding juice one as it is pure Vitamin C) it takes less of this Juice to turn the DCPIP straw coloured (an average of 13ml). In comparison to the others there was not much difference between them all. The Pure Orange Juice with Pure Mango took an average of 14ml to turn the DCPIP straw coloured. After doing some research on the Vitamin content on different fruits, it was seen that both mangos and grapefruits, Mangos and Oranges are excellent vitamin C sources. Fruit Latin name mg vitamin C / 100 grams mg vitamin C per average size fruit/slice* Ranking Grapefruit Citrus paradisi 34 44* excellent Mango Mangifera indica 28 57 Excelent Orange Citrus sinenis 53 70 Excellent * The values are for one whole fruit, however not many would eat a whole medium sized watermelon at a sitting, so for these larger fruit the value is for a slice, a 'slice' being, very generally, about an eighth of a medium sized fruit, or a quarter of a 'smaller' fruit. In the particular case of lemon and lime, the 'slice' value is juice of one wedge. For a few small fruit, such as Kei apple, the ranking is adjusted upward where the fruit mg/100 gram analysis shows it has large amounts of vitamin C, but the small size of the fruit gives it a lower per fruit vitamin C content. ...read more.

Conclusion

Making sure that the same method was used at all stages could have rectified this. This would have ensured that all the figures were reliable. Another problem that could have caused results to be unreliable is the readings that were taken. The syringes that were used had markings that went up in 5's. It's possible that the reading were not done very accurate and not made at their actual point. If this problem were consistent all of the readings would have been inaccurate. By having the same person doing the readings and also having used a syringe that has more reading points would have made them more accurate in that the individual points would have been easier to read. Another possible problem that was seen was the fact that the aim was to look for colour changes. It would not have been able to come to a sure conclusion of what was straw colour and what was not. It would have not been able to come to a sure mark of straw coloured. There would not no real solution to this problem as it would be dependant on the person. The only solution that could minimise this problem would be to have the same person making the judgments, as their perception of Straw coloured would be the same. Apart from the above points the investigation was went well and was carried out smoothly. The team were able to conclude the investigation with the use of gained figures and reactions. ...read more.

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