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Volume of oxygen given off in the reaction between catalase and hydrogen peroxide.

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Introduction

Volume of oxygen given off in the reaction between catalase and hydrogen peroxide. Introduction Catalase is a biological enzyme, which helps to speed up the reaction between catalase (celery) and hydrogen peroxide. The active site is contained within the enzyme and this is the important part, once the substrate is locked into the active site the reaction takes place then the products will be released with the enzyme moving on to another substrate. Enzymes are very specific to the reaction that they take place in and can only work on certain products this is called the 'lock and key' method. This method helps to speed up the reactions and to allow the correct substrate to interact with the correct enzyme. Prediction When the test is run I predict that the higher the concentration of catalase then the faster the reaction will occur due to the increased concentration of the enzymes in the liquidised celery. With the change in concentrations between the catalase and the distilled water then you should see a change in the amount oxygen produced as the catalase reacts with the hydrogen peroxide. Variables The only variable that there is going to be in this experiment is going to be the concentration of the liquidised celery; this will be changed in proportion to the percentage of distilled water so that it equals 100%. ...read more.

Middle

Apparatus to be used: * Conical flask * 10 cm3 syringe x 2 * Delivery tube and bung * Water container * Stop watch * Small beaker * 2 x clamps * Retort stand * Burette * Hydrogen peroxide * Celery (liquidised) * Distilled water * Measuring cylinder * Goggles Diagram Plan The apparatus should be set up like the diagram. As soon as the hydrogen peroxide is added to, the catalase/ distilled water solution, then the bung should be put on and the stopwatch started. The measurements of the volume of water displaced by the oxygen being produced by the reaction are to be taken every 20 seconds for a total of 3 minutes with each concentration repeated 3 times to gain an average. After each test then all the equipment needs to be washed so that the tests are fair and accurate. If the equipment is not washed properly then there may some hydrogen peroxide left over which would lead to an increase in volume of the substrate molecules, which would affect the rate of reaction. Risk assessment Due to the use of the hydrogen peroxide special care as to be used when handling this solution as it is corrosive. When handling hydrogen peroxide you must be wearing safety goggles to protect your eyes as if it were to get in your eyes it could cause blindness. ...read more.

Conclusion

A reason why I may have very few anomalous results could be dew to me not having many results, as all the water would be displaced before the time was up. Reading off the results was made difficult because of the number of bubbles coming up the tube would lead to the water being displaced quickly so a rough estimation would be used to where the water level was. The stopwatch would not be started exactly when the hydrogen peroxide would have been added so the reaction would of already started by the time the stopwatch was started. The first to tests have very similar results whereas test 3 has a few results which stand out and don't fit into the pattern, to overcome this I could of repeated the experiment a few more times or just not counted the third set of results. As I was unable to complete the experiment in one go and that lots of liquidised celery was needed meant that more than one batch was needed this could of lead to an inconsistency as the liquidised celery would not of all been the same consistency. As it was made on different days the celery would of come from a different country. So stop this problem from occurring then a bulk load of celery should have been brought. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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