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What is Bacterial Amylase's Optimum Temperature?

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Introduction

What is Bacterial Amylase's Optimum Temperature? Aim I am investigating the temperature at which bacterial amylase works the fastest. Variables The variable that will change in each experiment is the temperature of the enzyme, which will be at, 0�c, 23�c, 60�c, 70�c, 80�c, and 90�c. The variables that I will keep constant are: * The volume of iodine. I will keep this constant because the volume of iodine affects the colour, so there may appear to be more/ less starch simply because there is more/less iodine. * The volume of enzyme. The more amylase is present, the faster it will be able to work, so the results of the experiment will not be accurate unless all test tubes contain the same amount of amylase. * The volume of starch. The volume of starch must be kept constant because if there is more starch in one test tube than the other, then the amylase will take longer to work in that test tube, not because it is the wrong temperature, but because there is more to break down. ...read more.

Middle

Repeat this test every minute for fifteen minutes. 5. Repeat stages 1 to 4 for 3 other test tubes, adjusting the temperature of the water bath accordingly. 6. Fill a beaker with ice (at 0�c), and repeat stages 1 to 4, using the beaker instead of a water bath. 7. Fill the remaining beaker with water at room temperature (23�c), and repeat stages 1 to 4, again using the beaker instead of the water bath. Prediction I predict that bacterial amylase's optimum temperature is 70�c. I predict this because I think that at 0�c, the particles will not collide (because of the lack of heat energy), so the enzyme will not be able to lock on to the molecules to break them down. At 23�c, the particles will collide, and some starch will be broken down, but starch will still remain. At 60�c, most of the starch will be broken down because of more particle collisions due to more heat energy. ...read more.

Conclusion

The enzyme still worked at 80�c but was slower. This was because the temperature was too hot for the enzymes and some became denatured (damaged by the heat so that the enzymes could not 'fit' onto the molecules to break them down). This meant that there were less working enzymes, so the starch molecules were broken down more slowly. It didn't work within the fifteen minutes for the ice (0�c) and room temperature (23�c) test tubes because there was not enough heat for the particles to collide, and the enzyme cannot work if it is not in contact with the molecule. It didn't work within the fifteen minutes for the 90�c test tube because the heat made the active site (the part that locks on to the starch) of each enzyme had changed shape, meaning that they could not break down starch as the enzymes were denatured. Emma Carvell ...read more.

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