• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is DNA?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

DNA 'DNA is a nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in the cell and is capable of self-replication and synthesis of RNA. DNA consists of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. The sequence of nucleotides determines individual hereditary characteristics.'(1) Over the generations of man science has been used as the utensil to both explain and improve the existence of man. Throughout my essay I will be talking about the impact DNA has had on society. The discovery of DNA, its structure, and function was probably the most significant biological discovery of the 20th century. ...read more.

Middle

These breakthroughs now offer hope for patients who suffer from what were once untreatable diseases. The effects that the discovery of DNA has had on medicine are truly remarkable, but the impact crosses over into all aspects of our society. From cloning, to paternity cases, to determining the guilt or innocence of a suspect in a crime, to identifying victims, to breeding disease-resistant farm animals and growing more nutritious produce, the classification, analysis and manipulation of genes has transformed our world. The discovery of the structure and functions of DNA over the past 50 years has lead to a revolution in biotechnology the likes of which the world has never seen, the production of medicines, foodstuffs and gene maps through the science of genetics has caused a pronounced change in human society raising the possibility for ...read more.

Conclusion

Always there could be a great divide people who can afford the advantages of DNA and those who can not. But DNA clearly has alot more positive impacts on society than negative impacts. It's been around for over fifty years and still more and more cures and discoveries are being made from it. The contributions made by Rosalind Franklin and countless other scientists and researchers have allowed us to uncover the structure and behavior of DNA and apply that knowledge to better understand genetic diseases and infectious diseases, the immune system, cancer and aging. In turn, we've come to understand more about ourselves, where we've been, and what tomorrow will bring. By Claire McGill (1) The American Heritage(r) Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright (c) 2006 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Genetics, Evolution & Biodiversity section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Genetics, Evolution & Biodiversity essays

  1. Chromosomes and DNA

    The offspring are identical and they are called clones. Because of this, genetic problems are always passed on to the new generation. Sexual reproduction Plants can also reproduce by sexual reproduction. The offspring have the genes from two parents - their genes are different, so the offspring will not be identical.

  2. Recombinant DNA, genetically engineered DNA prepared in vitro by cutting up DNA molecules and ...

    The nucleus controls the growth and division of the cell. It also contains the structures that transmit hereditary traits (see Genetics). Enclosed by a two-layered membrane, the nucleus contains a liquid called nucleoplasm as well as strands of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)

  1. Genetic Modification

    We have exploited this property of Tat in order to confer translocating ability to the thymidine kinase (TK) protein of HSV-1. This enzyme determines conditional cytotoxicity in the presence of the nucleoside analogues gancyclovir (GCV) or acyclovir (ACV). Transfer of HSV-1 TK constitutes the basis for several gene therapy applications;

  2. Management style, culture & organizational structure.

    Theses different products cannot easily be separated, but it doesn't matter, as the marker genes can be used later to identify the correct hybrid. GENE TRANSFER Vectors containing the genes we want must be incorporated into living cells so that they can be replicated or expressed.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work