• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Whether temperature effects respiration

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Whether temperature effects respiration To start off this experiment I feel that it is suitable to explain the main facts of this study. Below is a section explaining respiration and aerobic respiration in detail. Respiration, chemical and physical processes by which animals and plants obtain oxygen and use it to release energy from food molecules. Respiration provides the necessary energy for carrying on all essential life processes. Respiration is divided into two distinct phases: external respiration and internal, or cellular, respiration. External respiration includes all steps in the process of delivering oxygen to each cell in the body and disposing of carbon dioxide, a gas given off as a waste product when cells use oxygen. In humans and other animals that have lungs, breathing is an essential part of external respiration. Internal respiration occurs inside every living cell and involves a series of chemical reactions that liberate energy from food. Some of the energy is transformed into body heat while the rest is used to drive other chemical processes that keep the body working. During internal respiration in animals, food molecules are usually combined with oxygen and carbon dioxide is usually released. The experiment that I will conduct is described as aerobic respiration. The word equation for aerobic respiration is: Glucose + Oxygen Carbon dioxide + Water + Energy Aerobic Respiration The primary method of processing energy for almost all plants and animals is aerobic respiration. ...read more.

Middle

In the final stage of aerobic respiration, the hydrogen released during the first three stages passes along a chain of enzymes and ultimately combines with oxygen to form water. The energy released from these reactions results in the formation of 34 molecules of ATP. This brings to 38 the total number of ATP molecules resulting from the oxidation of each molecule of glucose. "Respiration," Microsoft(r) Encarta(r) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. That segment of text tells us more about the scientific facts towards this experiment. To understand the experiment clearly I feel that it is necessary to explain the enzyme theory. Enzymes are large proteins that speed up chemical reactions. They bring together a small number of amino acids to form the active site, or the location on the enzyme where the substrate binds and the reaction takes place. Enzyme and substrate fail to bind if their shapes do not match exactly. This ensures that the enzyme does not participate in the wrong reaction. The enzyme itself is unaffected by the reaction. When the products have been released, the enzyme is ready to bind with a new substrate. This description of the enzyme is known as the lock and key method. ...read more.

Conclusion

Yeast - 3g ? Sugar - 3g ? Rubber tubing ? Thermometer ? Bubble wrap (insulation) ? Kettle ? Timer Diagram Method 1) First of all setup the experiment as shown above using the same apparatus explained 5 times. 2) Once each of the 5 experiments are setup add boiling water to each beaker according to the temperature using the thermometer. Place each separate experiment at 30'c, 35'c, 37'5, 40'c, and 45' c. To cool the temperature down so that you can reach the required temperature just add cold tap water. 3) Once all 5 of the experiments have been setup properly, then take a reading of the volume from each measuring syringe every 10 minutes using the timer. Take the measurement to the nearest cm3 4) Keep the experiments going for 50 minutes. Therefore you should have five results for every experiment. Prediction My prediction for this experiment is that the volume of the measuring syringe will increase according to the temperature. As the temperature gets hotter the volume in the measuring cylinder will increase. But as the temperature reaches 40'c to 45'c we will see that the volume in the cylinder has started to fall as it is starting to denature. After looking at all the experiments data collection you will see a gradual incline in the volume of the measuring cylinder. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Energy, Respiration & the Environment section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Energy, Respiration & the Environment essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    effect of temperature on the rate of respiration in yeast

    5 star(s)

    glycolysis and they will also remove hydrogen molecules from citrate in kreb cycle. Decarboxylase enzyme will also become active and starting to remove carbon dioxide much quicker from pyruvate and citrate in kreb cycle; where glucose will be made much more quickly as the temperature is increased.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    'An investigation into the ability of two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ...

    4 star(s)

    To the five flasks bearing the mark 'baking yeast', 2.00g of dried baking yeast should be added. Once made wet, the yeast is activated. Again the vessels should be stirred, in order to suspend and dissipate the contents throughout the flasks.

  1. the effect of bile concentration on the activity of the enzyme lipase during the ...

    Obtain a 100cm3 beaker and fill it with approximately 90cm3 of 3% lipase, then take it back to your working area and label it 3% lipase 12. Obtain a 100cm3 beaker and fill it with approximately 90cm3 of milk, then take it back to your working area and label it milk 13.

  2. Investigating the Effect of Temperature on Rate of Respiration in Yeast

    I could have experienced these anomalies for a variety of reasons. The reasons are the limitations that I was stuck with, and other sources of error. The main source of error would be human error involved with reading the apparatus, and measuring.

  1. A Comparative Study of the Density of Patella Vulgata (Common Limpets) in the Optimum ...

    There are approximately two high tides and two low tides every 25 hours, and about 6 hours between high and low tide. This is the daily pattern. All organisms on the rocky shore are either autotrophic (photosynthetic) primary producers or heterotrophic (digest organic molecules into smaller products then absorb them into their own bodies)

  2. Why the Body Needs Energy? Every living cell within the ...

    This stage of systemic circulation is known as renal circulation. * During this stage, the kidneys filter much of the waste from the blood. * Blood also passes through the small intestine during systemic circulation therefore this stage is known as portal circulation, however during this stage, the blood from

  1. out how different concentrations of the enzyme pectinase affect the degradation of the substrate ...

    * Gloves. To prevent any possible contact of the pectinase solution with my hands, so as to prevent any skin irritations. * Small towel. In order to place and remove beakers in/out of the water bath, and prevent any possible burns.

  2. How ATP is produced in both the chloroplast and mitochondria.

    The principal pathways are - 1. Glycolysis - the conversion of carbohydrate to pyruvate reduces NAD+ to NADH. 2. ?-oxidation of fatty acids to acetyl-CoA generates NADH and FADH2. 3. The TCA cycle - oxidation of acetyl-CoA to carbon dioxide generates NADH and FADH2.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work