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Whether temperature effects respiration

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Introduction

Whether temperature effects respiration To start off this experiment I feel that it is suitable to explain the main facts of this study. Below is a section explaining respiration and aerobic respiration in detail. Respiration, chemical and physical processes by which animals and plants obtain oxygen and use it to release energy from food molecules. Respiration provides the necessary energy for carrying on all essential life processes. Respiration is divided into two distinct phases: external respiration and internal, or cellular, respiration. External respiration includes all steps in the process of delivering oxygen to each cell in the body and disposing of carbon dioxide, a gas given off as a waste product when cells use oxygen. In humans and other animals that have lungs, breathing is an essential part of external respiration. Internal respiration occurs inside every living cell and involves a series of chemical reactions that liberate energy from food. Some of the energy is transformed into body heat while the rest is used to drive other chemical processes that keep the body working. During internal respiration in animals, food molecules are usually combined with oxygen and carbon dioxide is usually released. The experiment that I will conduct is described as aerobic respiration. The word equation for aerobic respiration is: Glucose + Oxygen Carbon dioxide + Water + Energy Aerobic Respiration The primary method of processing energy for almost all plants and animals is aerobic respiration. ...read more.

Middle

In the final stage of aerobic respiration, the hydrogen released during the first three stages passes along a chain of enzymes and ultimately combines with oxygen to form water. The energy released from these reactions results in the formation of 34 molecules of ATP. This brings to 38 the total number of ATP molecules resulting from the oxidation of each molecule of glucose. "Respiration," Microsoft(r) Encarta(r) 98 Encyclopedia. (c) 1993-1997 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. That segment of text tells us more about the scientific facts towards this experiment. To understand the experiment clearly I feel that it is necessary to explain the enzyme theory. Enzymes are large proteins that speed up chemical reactions. They bring together a small number of amino acids to form the active site, or the location on the enzyme where the substrate binds and the reaction takes place. Enzyme and substrate fail to bind if their shapes do not match exactly. This ensures that the enzyme does not participate in the wrong reaction. The enzyme itself is unaffected by the reaction. When the products have been released, the enzyme is ready to bind with a new substrate. This description of the enzyme is known as the lock and key method. ...read more.

Conclusion

Yeast - 3g ? Sugar - 3g ? Rubber tubing ? Thermometer ? Bubble wrap (insulation) ? Kettle ? Timer Diagram Method 1) First of all setup the experiment as shown above using the same apparatus explained 5 times. 2) Once each of the 5 experiments are setup add boiling water to each beaker according to the temperature using the thermometer. Place each separate experiment at 30'c, 35'c, 37'5, 40'c, and 45' c. To cool the temperature down so that you can reach the required temperature just add cold tap water. 3) Once all 5 of the experiments have been setup properly, then take a reading of the volume from each measuring syringe every 10 minutes using the timer. Take the measurement to the nearest cm3 4) Keep the experiments going for 50 minutes. Therefore you should have five results for every experiment. Prediction My prediction for this experiment is that the volume of the measuring syringe will increase according to the temperature. As the temperature gets hotter the volume in the measuring cylinder will increase. But as the temperature reaches 40'c to 45'c we will see that the volume in the cylinder has started to fall as it is starting to denature. After looking at all the experiments data collection you will see a gradual incline in the volume of the measuring cylinder. ...read more.

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