• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Assess the functionalist view that religion benefits both society as a whole and its individual members.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

5. 'Assess the functionalist view that religion benefits both society as a whole and its individual member. (18)' Functions have put forward their perspective on religion and how it benefits both society and the individual starting with how religion brings people together and creates social cohesion, which makes you feel like you belong in society as well as being apart of something which is much greater than yourself. While conforming to religious beliefs this allows us to gain morals, as well as giving us a variety of cultures allowing us to tolerate and accept different religions. Functionalists see religion as a positive aspect to society. Durkheim explains that religion makes a great contribution to society giving us social integration, and the source of social solidarity. His view on sacred symbols represents society's collective consciousness which is the shared norms, values beliefs and knowledge that make social life possible without such consciousness it would crumble. ...read more.

Middle

and can usually involve a religious ritual, such as a funeral for a death of a person this usually providing comfort and support. Secondly being uncertainty where unpredictable occasions are preceded by rituals to reduce anxiety whether it's a prayer for someone who is ill, this provides confidence and a sense of control for a person. Parsons combines both Durkheim and Malinowski's ideas and argues that religion is part of a cultural system and provides guidelines for actions in the forms of beliefs and values. Social life is full of contradictions and frustrations that threaten and challenge the meanings people place on life whether it's as an individual or as a group. Parsons argues that religion offers answers and functions to 'make sense' of the apparently meaningless and therefore helps promote understanding order and stability and for religion to restore the 'norm' within society. ...read more.

Conclusion

Functionalists ignore atheists and fail to see that they can live a fulfilled life with out any intervention of religion or God, and can still lead a comfortable life. Although religion is flawed it does promote many positive functions, allowing us to explore different cultures and religions and belief systems. They don't see one type of religion as dominant or there is just one type of religion and religious beliefs. It shows that religion can reassure people through hard times and give answers to unexpected events which may seem unexplainable which people can be comforted in time of need. Although some people may argue that the individual is sacred and not society such as Margret Thatcher who said that 'there is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women, and there are families'. Religion can be both a positive function for society as a whole and individuals but also negative, it depends on how it is viewed and in what situations. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Sociological Differentiation & Stratification section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a star student thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Response to the question

The writer demonstrates that they have a lot of sociological knowledge in the introduction – this is because they concisely state how religion is seen by Functionalists as both beneficial for society as well as the individual. Therefore it is ...

Read full review

Response to the question

The writer demonstrates that they have a lot of sociological knowledge in the introduction – this is because they concisely state how religion is seen by Functionalists as both beneficial for society as well as the individual. Therefore it is clearly answering the question set. The last two paragraphs provide the evaluation which is answering the “assess” part of the question. However I would add a short conclusion to summarise, stating why Functionalists see religion as beneficial to society as well as the individual. This writer focuses on only the individual in their last paragraph, not society, so I feel it is not a conclusion – just another section of the main essay.

Level of analysis

Immediately there is a mistake in the first line, “Functions have put forward their perspective...” (“Functions” instead of “Functionalists”) which gives the impression that the essay will continue to be full of mistakes. This is a crucial term in Sociology and for this specific question – so it must be put right!
The writer discusses views of Durkheim, Malinowski and Parsons who are the theorists that will certainly spring to mind to every Sociology examiner. They also mention key terms with regard to these Functionalists such as “social solidarity”, “social integration” and “norms and values” which is credible. What is particularly good about this essay though is that it cites contemporary examples and applies them to modern society, such as “’Margret Thatcher who said that 'there is no such thing as society: there are individual men and women, and there are families'” and it also mentions “suicide bombers” which shows the examiner the depth of their sociological understanding.
But at A Level I would expect to see other theories within Sociology discussed apart from Functionalists, for example radical feminists believe that religion is not beneficial for all of society, only men, as it legitimises women as second class citizens (for instance because the Bible portrays women as agents of evil and temptation – Eve tempted Adam to bite the apple). This would provide more evaluative marks.

Quality of writing

There are some grammatical issues in this essay, most of which probably would have been corrected if the candidate had checked their work. For example “whilst participating in shares rituals” instead of “shared rituals”. It just makes you look like an all-round candidate if you have a high quality of writing. Also the writer says “The individual see's religion” – the apostrophe here is not needed. This essay would hugely benefit from the use of quotation marks to show the examiner that the sociological terms they are using are someone else’s and not their own, for instance Malinowski coined the term “life crises”.


Did you find this review helpful? Join our team of reviewers and help other students learn

Reviewed by cwhite 13/09/2012

Read less
Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Sociological Differentiation & Stratification essays

  1. Free essay

    Assess the contribution of functionalism to our understanding of society

    3 star(s)

    If we define science as valid knowledge, then anti-positivists believe they produce science, but positivist sociology and natural sciences do not. However if science means producing generalizations and laws, then anti-positivist sociology no longer meets this criteria. The argument put forward by anti-positivists in response to this is that both

  2. Can and should sociology be a science?

    All research is inevitably subjective (value laden). For example the topic that is chosen for research, questions asked in interviews and the way that data is analyzed is based on the sociologist's values. Max Weber argued that sociology should remain as value-free as possible because human values can distort sound scientific investigation.

  1. The education system is meritocratic

    The view that the education system seems to be out weighed by the evidence against it's existence however, it must be accepted that there are more working class people in university than in the fifties when people did what

  2. Outline and Assess Whether stratification is either inevitable or beneficial to individuals and society?

    nature, that suggests people will perform tasks only for monetary or status rewards, they fail to consider people who work because they enjoy their job, and do it because they feel their making a difference in the world such as charity work etc.

  1. Autobiography - I am going to write about the first day at secondary school.

    bus every day and I felt relived, then when I got home I told my family about my first day and my journey to school and my brother laughed at me because I counted the bus stops when he was only joking about ten bus stops, but I showed every

  2. Critically assess the view that social stratification benefits the powerful groups in society

    They would argue that individual actions are a product of these social institutions socialising people into cultural values and norms, and as a result their actions are patterned and predictable (Giddens, 2006). Functionalists also see institutions such as employment organisations as allocating people to roles in which they can contribute to the running of society.

  1. Assess the usefulness of an Interactionists perspective on education.

    Interactionists Rosenthal and Jacobson (1968) showed how teachers responded to being told that some of their pupils were brighter than others. Certain pupils were selected as intellectually exceptional, although this was not necessarily true, the teachers proved to respond differently to these pupil?s and it brought out a higher self fulfilling prophecy in the pupils.

  2. Compare and contrast two sociological theories

    Critics like Sir Karl Popper have claimed that Marxism is unscientific in its methodology. In particular, he argues that Marxism is not a theory that can be tested and possibly falsified (www.sociology.org.uk). Another criticism of Marx was that, what he wrote was very vague and open to interpretation, especially what would happen after a proletariat revolution.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work