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Assess the Marxist view on the role of education in society

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Introduction

´╗┐Assess the Marxist view on the role of education in society Marxists have many different theories on the role of education in society. These theories are the ?hidden curriculum? which was found by Bowles and Gintis (1970), reproducing the working class workforce which was studied by Willis and that education is a Ideological State Apparatus which was found by Athusser. However, each of these theories can be criticised for factors such as being unable to generalise the study, feminist?s beliefs and disregard of gender ethnicity and culture, etc. One way in which Marxists believe the role of education in society is to teach pupils the ?hidden curriculum?. This is where pupils are informally taught things such as norms, values and beliefs. This was found by Bowles and Gintis (1970) through their study ?Schooling in capitalist America?. ...read more.

Middle

Marxists also believe that the role of education in society is to reproduce working class workers. This was found through Willis? (1970) study ?Learning to Labour?. In this study he followed 12 working class male students, which he named the ?Lads?. He used observations and unstructured interviews to do this. From this study he found that the ?Lads? had a counter school culture. This is where the values and beliefs held by the ?Lads? on subservience, motivation and acceptance of hierarchy were completely opposite to those held by the school and capitalism. It also showed that the ?Lads? purposely failed their exams so they could land the jobs that they had always wanted manual labouring in a factory with their old school friends with very little responsibility. The conclusion of this study was that education may not always offer perfect workers for capitalism but does not however mean that the education system has failed them as it has produced the working class workforce. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also argued that the working class were forced to fail so that they would then take on working class jobs with low pay and status. He also believes that the ruling class He also believes that the ruling class He also believes that the ruling class are instantly taken on at universities where they are then trained to take on their ruling class roles in society. In conclusion he found that all of these factors led to the reproduction of social class inequalities. However, Athussers study could be criticised as being unreliable due to it only being theory work and therefore lacking in evidence. Although some Marxist views on the role of education in society, Bowles and Gintis (1970) belief of the ?hidden curriculum?, Willis? belief of reproducing the working class and Athussers belief that education is a ideological state apparatus, share the idea that it is in place to benefit the ruling class by. Emily Cole ...read more.

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