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Assess the view that crime is functional, invetiable and normal

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Introduction

Sociology (b) Using material from Item A and elsewhere, examine some of the ways in which sociologists have linked their explanations of crime to one or more of the following areas: families and households; health; mass media (12 marks) Item A suggests that the family is the key insitituion in generating law-abiding behaviour. One way in which sociologists have linked their explanations of crime to the study of families and households, is by suggesting that the family was key to understanding the causes of crime. Some argue that the correleation between crime and certain family chracteristics is a reflection of a much wider change in society. They see that the three-generation family structure had provided stability and place in which moral values and sense of community belonging had been passed on. They also suggest that the changing roles of women in the family; the increasingly dominant role of the mother in the househols had led to the margunalication of the father, this led to fathers leaving their families, resulting in young males not having role models on which to base thier behaviour, and do not face the discipline at home that a father might provide. ...read more.

Middle

He suggests that the there are three elemenets of this positive aspects. One positive aspect is reaffirming the boundaries, this meant that everyttime a person breaks a law and is taken to courts, the resulting court ceremony and the publicity in the newspapers, publicly reaffirms the existing values, thus making crime to have a function. He also suggested that every so often when a person is taken to court and charged with a crime, a degree of sympathy occurs for the person prosecuted. This therefore could lead to a change in law in order to reflect the chaning values, which Durkheim saw as another positive aspect of crime. Another positive aspect that he argued crime played in society was it encouraged social cohesion. He points out that when particulary horrific crimes have commites, the entire community draws together in shared outrage, and the sense of belonging to a community is therby stregthened. However, it is argued that while a certain, limited amount of crime may perfrom positive functions for society, too much crime has a negative consequence. ...read more.

Conclusion

suggets that it isn't people who are bad, but that capitalist society controls and exploits workers for the benefit of ruling class. He suggests that when people are released in some way from direct control, they are more likely to commit crime because they see the unfairness of the system.On the other hand, Box (1983) suggets that it isn't people who are bad, but that capitalist society controls and exploits workers for the benefit of ruling class. He suggests that when people are released in some way from direct control, they are more likely to commit crime because they see the unfairness of the system. However, it is argued that while a certain, limited amount of crime may perfrom positive functions for society, too much crime has a negative consequence. It is argued that despite society being based on people sharing common values which forms the basis of action, in periods of great social change or stress, the collective conscience may be weakened. In this situation, people may be freed from the social control imposed by the colective conscience and may start to look after their own selfish interests rather than adhering to social values, this was called anomie. ...read more.

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