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Criminology - "Corporate and white-collar crimes are less serious than other kinds of crime, such as violent crime"- Discuss.

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Introduction

Criminology - major essay Topic - "Corporate and white-collar crimes are less serious than other kinds of crime, such as violent crime." Discuss There is a public misconception about white-collar and corporate crime. Many people believe that these crimes are less serious than other forms of crime, such as violent crimes. However, this is far from the truth. White-collar and corporate crimes are just as serious as other forms of crime, if not more so, and the effect they have on society is often more far-reaching. In this essay I will be discussing the severity of corporate and white collar crime in comparison to other forms of crime. I will be providing explanations as to why it is a serious issue in our society, and one that people do not always understand. There are many different forms of white-collar and corporate crime, but all have one thing in common. That is, they are usually "committed by persons from a middle or upper class socioeconomic background in the course of their occupations"1. White collar crimes include such offences as commercial bribery, tax fraud, environmental offences, and computer related crimes. ...read more.

Middle

Over the two-week period, it is estimated that "about 1.3 million households and 89,000 businesses were affected and export earnings alone, were cut by over $200 million"11. The total amount of money that businesses lost was thought to be about "$1.3 billion as reported by the Financial Review, 27/4/99"12. When we compare these figures to the effect of violent crime, and other forms of crime, we are able to see the true seriousness of white-collar and corporate crime, and cost they bear to the whole of society. White-collar and corporate crime may affect the whole of society, however, society is not as aware of white collar and corporate crimes as they are other forms of crime. As Grabosky and Sutton argue, "despite the prevalence of corporate crime in Australia, public awareness of its dimensions seem limited"13, and thus, individuals do not take the precautions necessary to protect themselves from it. A reason for this is because white-collar crimes are hidden from the public view, and "are carried out under the cover of normal occupational routines"14. On top of this, when somebody is attacked or robbed, "it is clear to all involved...that a crime has taken place"15, however, white-collar and corporate crimes often go undetected, and "the victims of corporate crime may not even be aware of the offence"16. ...read more.

Conclusion

EMA Disaster Events Date Tracking System (EMATrack). 15 April 2002. http://www.ema.gov.au/archives/ematrack/EMATrackEvent6615.htm (24 April 2002) 12 Gas Explosion and Supply Crisis. EMA Disaster Events Date Tracking System (EMATrack). 15 April 2002. http://www.ema.gov.au/archives/ematrack/EMATrackEvent6615.htm (24 April 2002) 13 Grabosky, P & Sutton, A (Eds), 1989. Stains on a White-collar. Fourteen Studies in Corporate Crime or Corporate Harm, Century Hutchinson Australia, Milsons Point. p xii 14 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes.p 243 15 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes.p 243 16 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes.p245 17 Daly, K (1995) "Celebrated Crime Cases and the Public's Imagination: From Bad Press to Bad Policy?" in The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, Vol 28, No.3.p9 18 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes.p243 19 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes. p 255 20 Muncie, J & McLaughlin, E (Eds), 1996. The Problem of Crime, Sage Publications, Milton Keynes. pp254-256. 21 Hazlehurst, KM (Ed), 1996. Crime and Justice. An Australian Textbook in Criminology, LBC, North Ryde.p260 22 Hazlehurst, KM (Ed), 1996. Crime and Justice. An Australian Textbook in Criminology, LBC, North Ryde. p260 ...read more.

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