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Describe the employment opportunities of woman in Britain in 1914 at the out break of the war

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Introduction

Describe the employment opportunities of woman in Britain in 1914 at the out break of the war? There were very less employment opportunities for women in Britain in 1914 at the outbreak of the war than there were today, because of the prevailing social attitudes and a lack of educational opportunities for girls. The Government census of 1911 revealed that over 11 million adult women did not have paid jobs. There were about 5.9 million women workers employed. This was because women were expected to marry and become housewives. Their position and status were directed towards maintaining the annual duties of the family and children. These duties consisted of cleaning and caring for the house, caring for the young, cooking for the family, maintaining a yard, and sewing clothing for all. Enid Starkie, writing in 1941, remembers her childhood at the turn of the century (from A Lady's Child). ...read more.

Middle

Their pay was very low, sometimes only �5 or �10 a year and they often only got one half day in a week- or even a month- off. Servants who 'lived out' (in their own homes) were better paid. The textiles industry was a major employer of women, as it had been since the Industrial Revolution. The number of women employed in the textile industry were 0.6 million. Women could supervise the spinning and weaving machines as effectively as men, but men filled most of the posts of overseers. In the textiles industry pay of women was much lower than for men. The Lancashire textile mills were very famous for employing large number of women. Indeed the percentage of Lancashire working class women with a job was about the same in 1900 as it is today. Potteries were another work place where women were employed. There were fairly high numbers of women working in pot banks. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was very difficult for women to be promoted. Many people simply thought that women were less capable than men. One reason for this was that women were often not as well educated as men. By 1900 boys and girls received a similar basic schooling. However, far more boys than girls were likely to go on to secondary' school. Only 2% of women received secondary education. Just a very few rich girls went to university. The employment opportunities for women were quite limited, especially the working class, principally because of prevailing social attitudes and expectations in Victorian and Edwardian society. The poverty of fathers reflected on the lack of educational opportunities for girls. Some married women worked because of their poverty but in professions like teaching or banking married women could not work. By 1900 boys and girls received a similar basic schooling. However, far more boys than girls were likely to attend secondary schools. Just a very few rich girls went on to university. ?? ?? ?? ?? Amit Parpani 4NB ...read more.

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