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Discuss the similarities and differences between the National Literacy Strategy at Key Stage 2 and the Framework for Teaching English Years 7, 8 and 9.

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Introduction

Discuss the similarities and differences between the National Literacy Strategy at Key Stage 2 and the Framework for Teaching English Years 7, 8 and 9. You must make references to wider research and inspection evidence that has underpinned the development of the two strategies. There are many similarities and differences between the National Literacy Strategy at Key Stage 2 and the Framework for Teaching English Years 7, 8 and 9. The National Literacy Strategy sets out teaching objectives for reception to Year 6 enabling pupils to become fully literate. It ensures high expectations of pupils, and understands how pupils progress throughout years at primary school, it also helps to offer balance between reading and writing. The Framework for Teaching English builds upon the guidelines and requirements given in the National Curriculum, however it is more specific. Whereas the National Curriculum is statuary the Framework for Teaching is only recommended. Many small primary schools have classes that have two year groups in them, the teachers of these classes run the curriculum on a two year rolling programme. The National Literacy Strategy is based on 2 year cycles, so objectives within years 2/3 3/4 and 5/6 are more closely linked than those between these pairs of years. ...read more.

Middle

Effective differentiation ensures that teaching can be based on the Framework whatever the ability range of the class. Different strategies are used to differentiate work for the different levels of pupil ability. In Key Stage 3 pupils entering Year 7 who have not yet secured the important skills that enable them to be independent readers and writers are able to revise and cover what was taught in Key Stage 2, this is linked to the opportunities that can be had during Key Stage 2. The Framework for Teaching also lays out a clear line of progression to be charted in teaching plans. Teachers can choose and use texts to deliver the objectives relevant for the year group. Pupils in one school studying a certain array of books will one way or another have covered the same objectives by the end of the key stage as pupils in another school who have studied quite different texts. Studying a Range of texts remains an important principle. A range of books contributes to progression in the secondary years because it enables pupils to generalise about their reading experiences, compare and evaluate texts against each other, and to become more discriminating readers. ...read more.

Conclusion

Careful management offers high levels of involvement for all pupils particularly the less able, who generally gain confidence quickly. The Framework for Teaching does not thoroughly go into the organisation and management of the activities but it is clear that during secondary school it is common for a class to be taught as a whole class in their ability groups, however sometimes on occasion lesson are taught in small groups or even individually if the class sizes are small enough however in this day and age it is unlikely that class sizes are ever small enough. In conclusion I feel that although there are a lot of differences between the National Literacy Strategy and the Framework for Teaching they are very similar. Both focus on the progression of pupils learning and the need to differentiate throughout the years enabling the less able to learn the objectives and the more able to progress further, however I feel the need to state that nowhere in either of these documents does it state that 'average' pupils that are neither higher or lower ability receive any form of differentiation or extra help. Mairead Mitchell - 1 - ...read more.

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