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Do you think that "Crocks and Robbers" challenges preconceptions and stereotypes about a section of society traditionally as victims, rather than aggressors?

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Introduction

Do you think that "Crocks and Robbers" challenges preconceptions and stereotypes about a section of society traditionally as victims, rather than aggressors? The programme at first begins to represent the six disabled criminals as the victims or criminal society, rather than the aggressors. However, as the documentary progresses, it is obvious that some the spectrum of representation broadens out from the victim, to the aggressor. To begin with, three of the criminals (Julian, Robbie and the woman with arthritis) said that they turned to crime because they could not get a job, as a result of their disability. Michelle Ellis, commenting on the programme on the Channel 4 website says: "Being disabled myself, I find it hard to understand that at least 2 of the people portrayed said that they would not manage to get a job - this is totally untrue!" This suggests that the representation of these criminals is worst-case scenario, and that the institution is only trying to portray the aggressors as victims. ...read more.

Middle

Originally, he was thought to be the Charles Bronson (the criminal, not the actor) of the disabled world, and then turned into Robert, the disabilities teacher for children with disabilities. Which was a binary opposition between the two representations of him. Darren, the wheelchair bound armed robber, was all along represented as a victim, and as a moral standing, he was. He did not believe that crime is moral or right, and he has now dismissed the whole "incident" as a thing of the past, and a mistake. He is now a successful businessman and the owner of a successful Internet Marketing company. Paul, the man with MS, on the other hand, is represented as a crook, which he is. He smuggles drugs into the country in his Zimmer Frame, dealt drugs until his arrest, and announced to the filmmakers, in a proud tone: "Being disabled is a licence to get away with murder." ...read more.

Conclusion

Robbie should have had another programme made about himself, as he was a constant offender, showed no remorse for his actions, blamed his self-inflicted disability for his life of crime (which subsequently occurred at least 2 years AFTER his life of crime began) and was obviously a very uneducated man in the first place. His motives were constantly changing, very circumstantial, and were obviously his cover for criminal acts for the sake of criminal acts, meaning, "he just felt like it." Overall, I believe that Channel 4, and the director/producer, Norman Hull, needs to rethink on whether he is representing victims or aggressors, and once decided, actually represent the victims as victims, and the aggressors as aggressors, as there was a great deal of victims and aggressors represented as the other. Therefore I can say that this programme represented disabled people as both victims and aggressors, but (with exception of Julian, Robbie, Darren and the housing benefit fraud woman) the wrong way around. Adam Barrett ...read more.

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