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Domestic Violence

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Introduction

Examine the patterns of, and reasons for, domestic violence in society Domestic violence occurs across society regardless of age, gender, race, sexuality, wealth or where you live. Domestic violence is a wide range of abuse from physical and sexual abuse to emotional and financial abuse e.g. the victim is controlled in some aspect of their lives through fear of violence, physical or verbal, or they may be deprived of food, sleep or money. Victims of domestic violence suffer on many levels and some lose the freedom to live their lives how they want without fear. Dobash and Dobash (1979) interviewed female victims of domestic violence. Dobash and Dobash found that violent incidents could be set off by what a husband saw as a challenge to his authority such as his wife asking why he was late home for a meal. The women interviewed had left their abusive partners and had gone to a refuge. ...read more.

Middle

Violence against women is only part of the problem. It is sometimes the woman who is violent towards her man. This is known as the hidden side of domestic violence. For a man to be on the receiving end of abuse is often seen as him being weak, and sadly this adds to the reluctance men have to come forward and speak about it. But it happens all the same. The humiliation which accompanies abuse makes it just as hard for men to break free and seek help. Violence not only affects men and women, Mirrelees-Black found that other social groups at greater risk of domestic violence include: children and young people, those in lowest social classes, those who live in rented accommodation, those on low incomes or in financial difficulties, those with high levels of alcohol consumption and users of illegal drugs. These are common patterns found in sociological research to be causes of domestic violence. ...read more.

Conclusion

Wives were originally considered to be the only victims of domestic violence. However, husbands as well as same- or different-sex non-married partners are considered to be victims as well (Cruz, 2003). In conclusion domestic violence is seen as a very negative type of behaviour which is normally hidden. It can affect anyone in a number of ways. Research into domestic violence has shown that there has been an increase in men reporting abuse in modern day as they no longer feel the fear of humiliation; however it is still apparent that women are majority the victims. With the current British recession domestic violence statistics could increase because of the financial worries and difficulties people are facing. The economic crisis is fuelling a rise in domestic abuse with men "taking their financial fears out on their partners". (From the daily express February 17th 2009). I think that domestic violence will stay at a constant rate for women but will increase in the future of men as they will gain more confidence. However if the recession continues for a few years I think domestic violence statistics will rise. ...read more.

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