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Examine Changes in the Patterns in Childbearing and Childrearing in the UK since the 1970s

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Introduction

Examine Changes in the Patterns in Childbearing and Childrearing in the UK since the 1970s Before 1970, although the child protection act had lowered the amount of children a couple could have, there was a need for many children in a family. This was because after the first and second world war, there were many deaths across the country, and to replace them children were to be born. When the soldiers got back from war they came home to their wives which in the long term resulted in more births in the UK. Since the 1970s, there has been less of a need to have as many children because many things have changed since the war. The 1970s rise in lone motherhood was largely a consequence of increasing divorce rates. From the mid-1980s onwards it was more associated with childbearing outside of marriage. In 1991-3, 40% of mothers in lone mother families had never been married compared to only 18% in 1973-5. ...read more.

Middle

Infant mortality rate lowered a lot of births in the UK because more were successful and more children were surviving. This caused more parents to have fewer children so they can focus their love and attention on the children they have. When the IMR was high in the UK, the parent would have many children for work purposes and they would not care if the one child died because they had, for example, six more children to replace that one. Children were used as slaves to bring money to the family, but since the act that stopped children working under a certain age was in place, children were then becoming the centre of the home. The parents would see their child more and the child would then need the mother or father to help them when they were at home. This lead to lower IMR because of a breakthrough to stop infants' death, not just for children, but to benefit the whole country. ...read more.

Conclusion

As there were more protection acts, more rights for women etc, the TFR was also increasing. Women were now able to choose when to have children instead of worrying if they were too old to have children. Women postpone having children to an average age of 29 and fertility rates for women in their 30s is increasing so many women can have children later in life. Changes in the patterns of childbearing and childrearing in the UK since the 1970's are that IMR, due to better hygiene and nutrient, has increased; the changes of the position of women has meant equality for both genders; the TFR has increased and allows women to choose when they want to have children; children are now the child centre of a family, and finally children have become an economic liability. All of these factors have dramatically changed the way children are raised and born in the UK and since 1970 this change compared to the old traditional way of childbearing and childrearing is dramatically different. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ben Scaife 10/10/10 ...read more.

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