• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine some of the ways in which Marxists explain crime.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Examine some of the ways in which Marxists explain crime Marxist theories of crime, including the more recent neo-Marxist theories, are conflict approaches. They see society based on conflict between social classes, and social inequality caused by capitalism as the driving force behind crime. Traditional Marxists say that capitalism causes crimes, the term we use for this is criminogenic capitalism; capitalism, by its very nature causes crime. Crime and deviance are systematically created by the structure of capitalist society, the ruling class exploit the working class as they own the means of production. It breeds competition and commodity fetishism, whereby people gain a desire for material things. The people in question become obsessed with personal gain and coming out on top, breaking the law is a small price to pay for the reward of success. David Gordon argues that crime is a response to the capitalist system and is found in every single part of the class structure, even if the official statistics mark it out to be a working class problem. Marxists see law making and law enforcement as serving the interest of capitalism, Chambliss argues that law to protect private property ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore these laws e.g health and safety are not rigorously enforced. Neo Marxists however, focuses on the process by which the state defines certain activities as criminal and by this criminalizing certain groups. They look at the process of criminalisation in relation to the state as it seeks to manage the capitalist system. Taylor et al argued that traditional Marxism is deterministic; it sees workers as driven to commit crime out of economic necessity. Traditionalists reject that external factors such as anomie, subcultures, labelling or biological and psychology factors can cause crime. Taylor et al takes a more voluntaristic view (we have free will). They outline a full social theory of the deviance whereby the criminologist must consider; the way in which wealth and power are distributed, the circumstances surrounding the decision of an individual to commit an act of deviance, the meant of the deviant act for the person involved, the ways in which other members of society such as the police respond to t the deviant act and the impact of the deviant label. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some researchers give evidence of a third type -state crime where by the state or agencies such as police or military commit crime on behalf of the state. White collar crimes are often treated differently to other crimes, this is due to four main factors; these crimes are largely hidden from the public, large scale frauds are highly complex and difficult to unravel, it is difficult to allocate responsibility and they are often described as crimes without victims. The Criminal justice system is a lot more lenient with punishments, because they are more likely to issue official warnings instead of giving a jail sentence etc. The Regulatory bodies are more concerned with compliance than with identifying offences they advise rather than punish and thus white-collar criminals get away with. Merton's his strain theory was developed to explain this crime. If people in white-collar occupations find that pay increases and promotions blocked then they sometimes innovate and turn into illegal means to become successful. Corporations have subculture whereby they endlessly pursue wealth and profit, this culture encourages risk taking, success at all costs is demanded even if this means fraud, bribery and corruption. Breaking the law is just a small price to pay for the chance at monetary success. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Crime & Deviance section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Crime & Deviance essays

  1. Sociological Theories on Crime and Deviance

    The concept of a deviant career helps explain why being caught and labelled deviant may actually reinforce, rather than deter, one's commitment to a deviant career. For example, hospitalised mental patients are often rewarded with comfort and attention for "acting sick" but are punished when they act normally - for

  2. Free essay

    Assess the view that crime and deviance is the result of labelling, the media ...

    This agrees with Merton's views because it agrees crime is a working class phenomenon however it disagrees with him due to the fact that Cohen believes the crime is done in groups and for no monetary values but not achieved individually.

  1. Describe the concept of a 'Moral Panic' and explain how this may impact on ...

    about the problem, as a result of this they carry out more 'intensified' policing on the specific deviancy problem. This acquires a lot of police time as they are put under public pressure to make more arrests. Consequently, magistrates are put under additional pressure to deliver stricter sentences, making the initial fear formed by the media appear justified.

  2. How far does Becker's account (The Outsiders 1963) of the processes underlying the selective ...

    The enforcers can be seen as an unnecessary hassle. When it comes to commercial fraud, there are different reasons for non-reporting. These include the embarrassment of disclosing losses, especially for financial institutions because this could sully their reputation. For example, the ENRON and Arthur Anderson fiasco in 2002, concerning the falsification of accounts.

  1. Assess the right realist view that crime is the result of biological rational factors ...

    immersion in the American Dream: a culture hooked on Gucci, BMW and Nikes'. However opportunities to achieve these goals legitimately are blocked, so they resort to street crime instead. So utilitarian crimes such as robbery would cause these subcultures to gain an advantage on people in their own subculture by stealing some clothes that the less deprived can afford.

  2. The British Penal System

    If people are wrongly executed then there is nothing that any one person can do. This critic of the penal system does have a fair point, unless there is hard evidence or the accused admits to a crime then there is not any body that can determine the truth.

  1. Is Youth Crime a major Problem?

    Some children can build up a resilience to being violent when they are young, however much they are subjected to viewing violent acts they still do not become violent natured. While there are other children who grow up in a violent free environment, this will mean that they are most likely not to grow to become violent.

  2. Assess the view that crime and deviance is the result of labelling, the media ...

    An example of the deviancy amplification spiral is as follows: a crime or act of deviance is committed; newspapers then selectively report while sensationalising events to sell more newspapers. The police then become aware of the problem and begin to make more arrests which cause further disturbances and the media continues to report this.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work