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Examine the effects of industrialization on the structure of the family

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Introduction

Examine the effects of industrialization on the structure of the family Daisy Boois 12 lee Industrialisation came about around the late 18th century and early 19th century .industrialisation refers to the shift form an agricultural economy to one that is based on factory production. Industrialisation was considered as a factor that transformed British society in many respects. It is said to have had an effect on the family structure but many sociologist disagree to what degree it changed the family structure parsons (1955) claimed that industrialisation caused the transformation from extended family house holds to a nuclear family household. Whereas other sociologist like peter Laslett believe that the family has always been nuclear. So to what extent did the family structure change due to industrialisation? Parsons believed there were two types of society, industrial and pre-industrial society. He argued that these types of societies both had corresponding family structures that fitted there needs. He referred to this as a functional fit. He said there is a functional fit between pre-industrial societies and extended three or more generational family and a functional fit between industrial society and two generational nuclear family. Parsons argued that pre-industrial families were "units of economic production" work and home were not separated; family members worked together and lived together. ...read more.

Middle

Stage three was the modern industrial stage from about the 1900 from witch the symmetrical nuclear family started to emerge; as a result of social changed such as higher standards of living more married women getting paid work and the welfare state improved the living conditions Young and Wilmot's work show the importance of social class. Hardships encouraged some families to keep larger family units, because each member can help with child rearing, contributing to rent and food. Young and Willmott disprove parsons view on the family because it is considered as to generalised, where as there study shows a more in-depth study of the change of the family due to industrialisation. Michael Anderson used "exchange theory" to prove that the industrial 19th centaury kin preferred extended family network. Exchange theory involves the factors that motivate people to keep relationship with others depending on the cost and benefits. Andersons work showed because of industrialisation working class families formed extended families networks due to their hardship of the time, poor working condition in factories being dangerous and unhealthy pay. Extended families benefited its members because they could use older kin to take care of young while the parents went to work; also having other kin in the house hold brought extra money. Anderson also found that so son as conditions got better families started to cut ties with wider kin because they did not see the benefits. ...read more.

Conclusion

his sources because families could have had and extended network despite the fact that they did not life under the same roof. Due to the conditions families were exposed to sociologist like Young and Willmott and Anderson could be correct that the family might not have been extended but nuclear to begin with and changed because industrialisation especially in its early years that caused poverty. On the other hand the need for extended family in pre-industrial times could indicated that the family structure could have started out as extended because they lived as a economic unit of production, so the best way to keeping a farm especially a big farm having many people working on them, provided them with cheep labour and a way to survive. in addition statements that the family structure had always been nuclear cant be completely correct because industrialisation with a bit from help urbanisation did change the family structure. I would have to agree with parsons and young and Willmott that both there studies could be correct to a to some extent but also conclude that the effect of industrialisation to the family was that the family structure were not only extended in pre-industrialisation but also in early industrialisation because in both times a wider kinship seemed necessary and then after that in modern society they changed into nuclear isolated family units. ?? ?? ?? ?? Daisy Boois ...read more.

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