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Outline the reasons for crime and the consequences of crimes for both the victim and the criminal.

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Introduction

Outline the reasons for crime and the consequences of crimes for both the victim and the criminal. Crime is defined as an action that goes against the law of your country, for which punishment is laid down. People turn to crime for various reasons, but some of the main reasons are alcohol, drugs, and jealousy. Alcohol; many people drink to make themselves more sociable, and to make them feel good or relaxed, especially at weekends or on special occasions likes parties, weddings and birthdays. Alcohol reduces your inhibitions and can make you do things you wouldn't normally do when you're sober. These lowered inhibitions cause violent and criminal behaviour than any other drug. ...read more.

Middle

They steal items, which they later sell on so they can buy drugs. Jealousy; Crimes of jealousy are usually done out of passion, and aren't premeditated. Or they could be spur-of-the-moment type crimes. This is often the case when a husband/wife finds his/her partner in bed with another person. They become so infuriated that the lash out, but may later regret doing so. For every different crime, there's a suitable type of punishment. The punishment may be a minor one, such as a fine or caution for speeding. But obviously, more serious crimes will have more serious consequences. Murder is the most serious of all crimes, because it is the deliberate taking of a person's life, and like the teachings say, "the direct and voluntary killing of an innocent human being is always gravely immoral" (Gaudium et spes 51. ...read more.

Conclusion

For retribution. This is based on the Old Testament principle of "an eye for an eye". Often, this is applied to Capital Punishment - "a life for a life". In the U.S.A, members of the victim's family are invited to watch the murderer die, so they know that justice has been done. 3) To deter the criminal from re-offending and being punished again. It also shows that people who are thinking about committing a crime that it will not be tolerated, and they will be punished if they do it. 4) To reform the criminal. Jesus taught that seeking revenge is wrong, and you should love your enemies. 5) To show that the law must be respected and if you break it, you will be punished. ...read more.

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