• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Outline the view that white-collar and corporate crime are under-represented in criminal statistics.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Outline the view that white-collar and corporate crime are under-represented in criminal statistics. Crime is breaking the law. Crime statistics are measured in two ways in Britain. Firstly by Police recorded crimes and Secondly by British crime surveys. Police recorded crimes are crimes recorded by the police from which official statistics on crime are drawn, whereas British crime survey is a victim study, which asks people if they have been a victim of particular crimes. In this is essay I will be supporting the view that white-collar crimes and corporate crimes are under-represented in the criminal statistics. I will be looking at how and why corporate crimes and white collar crimes are under-represented, and provide evidence for my argument. I will also look at different theories to support my view e.g. Marxists, Strain theory and Subcultural theory. White collar crimes are committed by people of high social status and respectability in the course of their occupations (Edwin Sutherland -1960). ...read more.

Middle

(Croall, 2001). In Bhopal, in 1984, an escape of poisonous gas from a chemical plant killed more than 3,000 people and caused permanent injury to a further 20,000. The escape of gas was caused by inadequate safety procedures of the plant. No criminal charges were brought against the company when it agreed to pay $470 million in compensation to victims and their families. This shows that although the affect of corporate crimes are huge, people are rarely prosecuted. White collar crimes are given more lenient punishment e.g. they may be given a fine, a short sentence in an open prison and punished with community service. Marxists would also support this view and argue that there is one law for the poor and another for the rich. I will now argue why these white-collar and corporate crimes are under-represented in official statistics. Firstly the police are more likely to concentrate on offenders from the least powerful sections of society (e.g. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that these crimes are different because it is harder to pinpoint the blame on an individual. Strain theory argues that middle class people experience relative deprivation when they make comparisons with those better off than themselves so they turn to crime. So due to this there is a strain to anomie and pressure to turn to illegal means (Merton), whereas Subcultural theory argues that many corporations have a subculture that emphasis the pursuit of wealth and profit and the pressure to succeed leads to criminal acts. Marxists would agree argues that crime committed by the bourgeoisie is more likely to go unnoticed, with even the smallest of offences being punished when being committed by the proletariat. They argue that the law reflects the interests of the ruling class. Crimes of the powerful such as corporate crime e.g. failing to pay tax would be rarely prosecuted whereas those at the bottom of the class system are regularly prosecuted. This means that there is one law for the rich and one for the poor. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Crime & Deviance section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Crime & Deviance essays

  1. What explanations have been suggested for occupational crime? Is it different from conventional ...

    Bryant (1974:168) points out that although the amount of money obtained through occupational crime may exceed that of conventional crime, the offender is far less likely to be indicted, prosecuted, found guilty and punished compared to the conventional criminal. Sutherland, (1995:34)

  2. Critically discuss the practical and ethical difficulties involved when researching White Collar Crime. Give ...

    Much research on corporate crime in America has focused on the offenders reports on criminal activities. All these offenders have been convicted, there has never been a survey carried out on corporations asking for anonymously volunteered information surrounding crimes that have taken place in the work.

  1. Criminology - "Corporate and white-collar crimes are less serious than other kinds of crime, ...

    Their experience will enable them to be aware of violent crime, so they can protect themselves from it in the future. However, the consequences of white-collar and corporate crime are much more severe and far reaching. There are many reasons why white-collar and corporate crimes are more serious than other forms of crime.

  2. How far does Becker's account (The Outsiders 1963) of the processes underlying the selective ...

    According to Edwin H. Sutherland, in "White Collar Criminality", he points out that crimes committed by corporations are almost always prosecuted as civil cases, but the same crime committed by an individual is ordinarily treated as a criminal offence4. Examples like this show that deviance is not a simple quality,

  1. A Failing Justice System

    lands was rejected by Ahmet Necdet Sezer because of the language used in the laws.

  2. Compare the ways in which crime is presented in Moll Flanders and Roxana? Assess ...

    On the other hand Moll excuses herself for her crimes: 'The silver tankard calls out to her'. This strong metaphor expresses that the lavish way of living had somehow called out to her as it were a person, this use of pathetic fallacy makes it seems as though the silver

  1. Criminal Investigation Procedures

    This is where I found the prime suspect. I matched the suspect with the modus operandi, I then prepared a plan of questions in order to interview the suspect. Modus Operandi of the Suspect * Class word- The class of person that may have committed this crime may have been involved in drugs.

  2. Compare and Contrast the intended Crimes, Victims and Villains in the short stories "A ...

    He likes to be a bit risky with his young life and has a character that is very buoyant, intelligent and a little gullible. In 'The Landlady' though, the victim is a man named Billy Weaver who is an educated, sensible and polite character who is 17 years old, dresses

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work