• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"The British media's coverage of asylum seekers and refugees is characterised by stereotyping, exaggeration and inaccurate language." Discuss this statement, with reference to at least two newspaper articles.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"The British media's coverage of asylum seekers and refugees is characterised by stereotyping, exaggeration and inaccurate language." Discuss this statement, with reference to at least two newspaper articles. A Cardiff University research team found that in the 12-week period studied in depth, there were fourteen negative front page articles on asylum, more than one per week. The majority of these front pages were in the Daily Mail and the Daily Express. In the two articles we studied, both had negative representations of asylum seekers and gave the audience a biased opinion of refugees seeking asylum and benefits in the UK, just as the statement suggests. The articles use an unflattering use of language to outline what the Mail and Express call an 'overburdening' and 'troublesome' problem. Stereotypical images are portrayed in these newspapers and readers would imagine their 'average asylum seeker' as undeserving, unemployed and just 'scrounging' money from the government. The Mail and Express rely heavily on politicians and dwell on negative statistics, and examples, to represent asylum seekers in a pessimistic light. The articles continually highlighted the amount of money given in 'handouts' as a huge sum of money and other valid comments [such as family sizes] appeared irrelevant. ...read more.

Middle

The article in the Daily Mail highlights the asylum problem and the huge amounts of people who are trying to claim benefits. The story also states the problems such as refugees refusing free flights home and the governments struggle to deport large numbers of failed asylum seekers. An 'average' refugee is represented as a person who would leave their children and family to scrounge together all the cash they could and abandon their loved ones. Another example of negative language is displayed in the Daily Express article, "50,000 bogus asylum seekers to stay." Terms like "Britain, a magnet, for refugees" and "illegal" portray an image of criminals persisting to get into "our" country. As in the Daily Mail article, quotes were not from asylum seekers themselves but politicians and the government. The journalist's use of pyramid writing gets all the negative information crammed into the first paragraph, the section everyone reads first. "An amnesty allowing up to 50,000 asylum seekers to stay in Britain, even though most are living here illegally, was greeted with fury last night." The second paragraph the follows after stating; "Critics warned that the public would be appalled by the controversial move, which would make Britain 'a magnet' for refugees". ...read more.

Conclusion

Love is evident in the picture but the expressions show the reader they are clearly unhappy. The building behind shows it's cramped, impersonal and reminds us of exploitation by landlords. Contrastive conjunctions such as 'shabby', 'crammed' and 'tiny' are used to describe their home and the article focuses on challenging normal representations. "With a baby on the way" and "treating patients in a thriving local practice" have connotations of caring, loving people and the audience will start to become more sympathetic with the new positive light being shown. The article examines the treatment of refugees in the UK and reveals how brutal assaults were the result of racial discrimination. The media should seek to portray asylum seekers and refugees in less stereotypical ways, in particular by including more images of women and children in their reports. 'Handouts' should be replaced by 'benefits' and more quotes from refugees themselves instead of endless statements from politicians and un-sourced government figures. It's offensive and insulting to asylum seekers. Pictures of women and children represent caring people and also show the articles like the Mail and the Express in a negative light. Language like 'everything seemed perfect' and 'her typical day would involve treating patients' help the audience to sympathise with the people whereas in the Mail, it gives the impression we are superior against refugees. Emma Orvis 9G ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Media section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Media essays

  1. To what extent do media representations of refugees and asylum seekers limit their integration ...

    because these terms are often employed in an incorrect and contradictory way. For example, a reporter may make reference to an 'illegal asylum seeker', since everybody has the fundamental right to request asylum under international law, this term is contradictory and does not really make sense (RAM, 2004).

  2. Moral Panic and media folk devils.

    In my sample questionnaire I handed out twenty papers to children aged fourteen to fifteen in my revised version I handed out fifty (25 to under 16s and 25 to over 16s). My revised version then covered a wider variety of people and allowed me to compare different age categories.

  1. How does the media represent female bodies?

    Content analysis involves statistical analysis, and the development of an analysis grid with preset categories. At a later stage Seale (2004) suggests more categories may arise after the content has been carefully explored. The aim of this approach is to limit the margin for interpretation of the underlying patterns of behaviour.

  2. Do the Media have the power to shape public opinion?

    When asked why they had done such a thing they stated that their key influence was 'other people'. The opinion leaders are the people who have such an influence and on the attitudes of the the people who had changed their vote.

  1. How does media impact on our daily life?

    For example, it was reported that the Killer Bees found in Africa would swoop over the North American country and cause the death of many Americans. However, the bees never came, but enormous effort was put into preparing for their arrival, all being dominated by the media.

  2. Refugees and asylum seekers - the facts.

    Around a half of those who apply for asylum in the Uk are found to be in need of Humanitarian protection, the four largest groups of asylum seekers are escaping from countries with harsh and oppressive regimes or severe ethnic conflict - Iraq, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan and Somalia.

  1. How is Crime represented in the Media

    per cent is the lowest level since the survey began in 1981. Percentage changes in recorded crime, 2004/05 to 2005/06 BCS crime and police recorded crime by type of crime, 2005/06 Primary Research To start My Primary research I have already decided what methods I am going to use.

  2. "The British media's coverage of asylum seekers and refugees is characterised by stereotyping, exaggeration ...

    At the end of the headline it writes "(and its all tax free)" this is written to provoke taxpayers. Normal fair hardworking citizens of the country are paying the correct tax and these intruders are exploiting the system by living off the tax payers money.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work