• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The recent rise in support for religious sects comes mainly from an increased desire to reject mainstream values. Evaluate this claim.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The recent rise in support for religious sects comes mainly from an increased desire to reject mainstream values. Evaluate this claim. Some sociologists such as Stephen Moore believe that a sect is a type of religious organization which involves the idea that a sect is usually fairly small in membership and very exclusive in their acceptance of members. They place great stress on obedience and strict conformity to the rules of the sect. They believe that only they know the correct way to Heaven. Many religious sects believe that we are living in a corrupt world with corrupt morals and values. They are generally more critical of the rest of society and expect members to stand apart from it. ...read more.

Middle

Sects demand high standards of behaviour from their members and high levels of commitment. Much of the member's spare time is spent in sectarian activities such as bible study, trying to gain converts or socialising with sect members. If members fail to meet the sects high standards they may be punished or even expelled. This strict lifestyle is desired and respect by the members and they believe it is the only way to Heaven. Members feel they do not receive the rewards they deserve in life. Some sects offer explanations for this and promise a better future on earth or in afterlife. Sects gain members through their beliefs and values being accepted by people who agree with their way of life. ...read more.

Conclusion

They have been appearing over the last 200 years. The only difference in the last 50 years is that there has been acceleration in their growth. The data bank of NRM's at the London School of Economics estimates that there are now nearly 2600 new religions. Many sociologists feel that the term New religious Movement adds little or nothing to the existing classification of religious organisations. Other sociologists claim that some of the NRMs are sufficiently different from existing religious organisations to justify the term NRM. They point to movements like the Unification Church, also known as the Moonies, which draw from a variety of belief systems and are difficult to classify in terms of the existing types. The founder of this movement has integrated aspects of Christianity, Taoism and Confucianism along with liberal sprinkling of new ideas which he has concocted. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Media section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Media essays

  1. Assess the view that cults and sects are inevitably short-lived and of little influence ...

    Cults can be popular for certain periods of time only, as modern culture is fast moving, trends can rapidly change and peoples interests can change. Some people only join when in crisis and leave when the crisis is over. Others are like businesses where there is a high turnover of

  2. Assess the claim that the Media works in ways that support the ideology of ...

    A second weakness would be that the owners do mot exist as an individual capitalist class who have recognisable interests in common, if this where so then journalist etc would be transmitting the views and ideas of the owners. Nergine argued that that there is potential for direct and indirect

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work