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The role of the Chamber of Commerce is to act on behalf of its members at local and national levels.

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Introduction

INTRODUCTION The role of the Chamber of Commerce is to act on behalf of its members at local and national levels. Their role is to act as the voices of businesses, to give businesses access to information and help businesses improve security. The Chamber of Commerce can provide training for businesses to enhance staff awareness. This report aims to highlight to the Chamber of Commerce how its member's ways in which crime prevention could be improved to protect companies and businesses. Each year billions of pounds are lost through crime at the workplace, either through staff embezzlement or fraud or through things like shop lifting and credit card and cheque fraud. We will look at each of the types of crimes individually. Conklin (1977) gave the following definition of business crime: "Business crime is an illegal act, punishable by a criminal sanction, which is committed by an individual or a corporation in the course of a legitimate occupation or pursuit in the industrial or commercial sector for the purpose of obtaining money or property, avoiding the payment of money or the loss of property, or obtaining business or personal advantage" (Box: 1995: pg 20) WHAT DEFINES CRIME AT THE WORKPLACE? To understand what crime at the workplace means we will look at the types of crime which occur in the workplace and how each affects those involved, both directly and indirectly: The definitions of workplace crime we will look at in this report are: 1. ...read more.

Middle

Euromin, the company which had taken Simon on were cleared of manslaughter charges, but found guilty on two breaches of Health and Safety regulations at The Old Bailey on 29th September 2001. More details and information relating to the Simon Jones memorial campaign can be found at: http://www.simonjones.org.uk/background.htm It is possible that these companies do not deliberately ignore rules and regulations, how many of us will take short cuts to avoid walking that extra mile, or to save a few pounds? But this does not take away the fact that organisations are responsible for the health and safety of their employees whilst at work, or the public who provide the company with its form of income. Organised Crime: Those who deal in organised crime have a desire to gain financially; this sort of crime seems to be more economically motivated. When we think about organised crime we visualise the mafia type American gangster, and it is often seen to be glamorous and exciting. However the reality of organised crime is that it is prevalent among large corporate businesses like banks, transportation and the construction industry, among many others. Organised crime separates itself from other types of crime because of the high level of skill that is involved in its operations, leading to the assumption that those involved in this type of crime are highly intelligent and extremely adaptable people. They manage to exploit and adapt to their financial gain. In his book, Crime and Modernity, John lea says, "organised crime is not big business, it is part of big business, the criminal economy is a complex system of trading (in a variety of commodities: drugs, arms, radioactive material, art treasure) ...read more.

Conclusion

It is not targeted at conscientious companies that take their health and safety responsibilities seriously." (Home Office web site) Organised criminals do not confine themselves to national boundaries and the law have to become increasingly global in their outlook. They also need to be able to work in co-operation with organised crime groups at the root of much criminal activity, such as drug trafficking, human trafficking, counterfeiting and money laundering. These types of criminals are much harder to trace due to the amount of secrecy and size of these networks. Once again at the other end of the crime scale, prisons are full of those who commit acts of shoplifting and sell drugs on a small scale. We open the papers regularly to read about acts of this kind, and the public want to see retribution, the police are seen to be 'doing their job', well in retrospect they are, we all pay the price for shoplifters and credit card fraudsters. Shops and businesses need to look at ways of improving security further; more vigilance is required to prevent price rises and job losses. Staff need to be trained to understand the impact of shoplifting with a view to preventative measures. Design and layout of shops and businesses are of major importance to reducing crime, electronic tagging is a useful deterrent. With training and support from agencies such as the Chamber of Commerce we could reduce the number of work related crimes and improve public perception on crime and business. ...read more.

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