• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The struggle for the emancipation of women.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Cherry Robinson/ Dannie Hills 10/79 01/05/2007 Coursework: The struggle for the emancipation of women. Today we take for granted that women have the same rights as men. This was not always the case, before the first world war very few people believed women should have the same rights as men, even women themselves believed this was true. But some women did realise that they had as much right as men to do the things they did and were just as clever. Describe and compare the progress made to secure the rights for women between 1870 and 1900. There were three social classes: Upper class, middle class and working class. All women, though, were expected to raise the children and maintain the household. For upper class women this meant ordering their servants. Upper class women were very rich and were happy with their lives. They were treated almost as ornaments by men, to just look pretty. And they did, they had the finest clothes and a life of pleasure. They did not see a need for change. Middle class were not so wealthy but wanted to be like the upper class women and so they copied and mimicked them. These were the wives of men who worked in manufacturing. ...read more.

Middle

These new laws Guaranteed education of Middle and Working Class women. Women started to think for themselves after this but sexism was still there, it was an improvement but wasn't a huge improvement. The Elementary schools may of given opportunities to the lower classes but these were largely overcrowded and they had to leave at the age of 9, which doesn't help them much as at this age they were still too young for jobs. There was progress during this period, due to the fact of before this time there was no guaranteed education for the working class, as after 1870 this was made possible. By 1875 Maria Grey had started the Public Day School Trust patterned on N.L.C.S. and Cheltenham Ladies College. This school started the Cambridge local exam (which was an exam similar to our GCSE's) this exam gave university entrance possibility. Before 1873 no university would accept girls but in 1873 Cambridge university opened Girton College and Newnham College for girls, it was completely separate dorms to the boys college though. Soon after this Oxford university opened Lady Margaret Hall and Sommerville college. This meant that upper and middle class girls could finally achieve a good education just as well as men could. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 1888 women were able to vote in the County and Borough elections, this was one of the first steps in which women had taken in how their country was run. Until 1907 women were not allowed to become Councillors, around this time women started to form groups and organizations that campaigned for women's right to vote, such as the N.U.W.S.S, this started to lift off and more and more women started to fight to gain this franchise. This was Progress as it was a starting point for Women's rights. The Married Women's Property Acts let women have some Legal rights, but this did not allow them to vote for their own country, although they were allowed to vote and run for Local Elections. Men thought these rights were too much, they thought that the women couldn't votes sensibly and should leave it too their husbands. As women became more and more independent and educated they wanted equal legal rights. They wanted all their wealth and possessions and earnings to belong to them and not their husbands. They gained legal status in 1882 but still did not have the right to vote. In 1888 women were allowed to vote in county and borough elections. By 1900 there were many women's organisations to win the vote. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Work & Leisure section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Work & Leisure essays

  1. Report on: Lowood Institution for Orphan Girls.

    When going outside, either to the garden or to the church etc. a straw bonnet is put on and a grey cloak made of frieze. On the foot, shoes are worn, often with holes in them. In winter, these clothes are insufficient to protect the girls from the severe cold.

  2. Multi-agency working

    launched in 2003, at least partly in response to the death of Victoria Climbi´┐Ż. The word child applies to anyone under the age of 19. Its main aims are for every child, whatever their background or their circumstances, to have the support they need to: * Be healthy * Stay

  1. The Education Act of 1870.

    There was an agricultural and industrial change occurring. The disappearance of the communes, new ideas in farming and the Enclosure Acts broke up the old self-contained villages, and gradually deprived the agricultural labourer of his means of subsistence.

  2. Find out what subjects girls study more in higher education as well as for ...

    In her research she looked at gender roles, masculinity is associated with individualism, ambition, and dominance. Femininity is associated with kindness, being affectionate, being eager to soothe etc. She also talks about biology being taken up by more girls at A levels because it is a caring subject.

  1. a) With reference to the Items and elsewhere, assess the view that the introduction ...

    Working class may be culturally deprived. They may be deficient certain values and attitudes and skills essential for educational success. These could include a lack of ambition and motivation where neither parent or child thinks that succeeding is that important. They accept that they probably are going to achieve the best qualification and as a result they experience immediate gratification.

  2. In the 15th Century the idea of 'schooling' began, the church ran the schools

    Working class children are more likely to have a part time job whilst at school and likely to leave education at 16. The Plowden Report (1967) noticed in working class households there was an absence of books, educational toys, lack of finance, lack of motivation, no parent support of due

  1. In "Those Bastards" Simon Armitage writes about the fear that upper classes have upon ...

    Moreover, by claiming that they are Gods, both personas have a great confidence, they are deluded and they feel that they can otherthrow the elite - that's why she is scared. Moreover, the tone of those two poems differ in order to emphasize two types of the disspossesed.

  2. Match Girls Sources Questions

    Question 3: Study Sources C and D A. What different impressions of the Match Girls are given off by Sources C and D? Source C is a late nineteenth century drawing showing the matchgirls at work. The girls in the factory are appropriately dressed and well groomed.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work