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Using information from the items and elsewhere, assess the extent to which pupil subcultures are the cause of failure at school(TM)

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Introduction

                                                        Monday 9th March 2009 �Using information from the items and elsewhere, assess the extent to which pupil subcultures are the cause of failure at school�. Failure is school may be due to a number of factors, however the most obvious and common is pupil anti-school subcultures. A subculture defines a group of people within a larger culture that shares aspects of that culture but also some of its own values, customs ect. A majority of school students will accept the rules and the authority of teachers without question, but there is a small minority of students that will choose not to follow school rules and choose to misbehave and not complete school work in hope of becoming more popular within their peers perspective. Subcultures in general, have things in common: they try to gain higher states then their peers, mutual support and a sense of belonging from the subculture.  These subcultures can be pro-school or anti-school. Sociologist Paul Willis (1977) wanted to investigate the reasons behind these mainly male, anti-school subcultures. His study showed that working-class �lads� learned to behave at school in ways quite at odds with capitalism�s supposed need for a docile workforce. The main aim of the �lads� at school was to have a �laff� by rejecting the values of the school. ...read more.

Middle

then its very unlike that you would get picked on by other subcultures, but pro-school subcultures are more likely to be bullied as they may be perceived as �geeks� or �nerds� by the popular students. Writers such as Hargreaves and Willis refer to the pro- and anti-school cultures as homogenous, which are coherent groups that share their own uniform sets of values. Peter Woods (1983), however, argues that this is too simplistic and that pupils use a variety of adaptations, some pupils may accept aspects of the school�s values and reject others. But in many cases the response will vary within and between different pupils, institutions and location. Woods makes a relevant point in that different students have different adaptations, and it depends on the family background, class, where the student lives, the community they are brought up in ect.  For example middle-class and higher-class student may go to high performance public school and in that kind of institution there may be less anti-school subcultures than in a private secondary school in east London.     The anti-school male subcultures were made apparent in the 70s were most students could get jobs despite their lack of qualifications, which meant that students didn�t necessarily need to pay attention at school, they could just have a �laff (Willis 77)�. ...read more.

Conclusion

To conclude I believe that subculture to some extend are the case of failure at school, in that a number of pupils do not value education, and focus on building a ?cool? reputation within their subculture. In most cases that means that the students with interrupt lessons and not do set tasks set by the teacher, which as a result will bring down achievement as they are not focusing on the information given by the teacher and also them kind of students are not allowing pro-school subcultures to learn because of the bad behaviour or interruptions going on in class. However I think subcultures vary in many aspects and different subcultures will have different ideologies depending where they live, their socio-class and the background they come from. Not all subcultures are anti-school, there are also pro-school subcultures, so we can not generalize subcultures. P.S I am not sure if I answered the question correctly, if not then SORRY. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ ...read more.

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