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What are the advantages and disadvantages of Censorship.

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The censorship debate is a long one, and the numbers seem to be equally divided between both sides. Censorship exists in all forms of media, and far beyond it. Those against are not campaigning for a completely censorship free country, but just to minimise it to an extent where it is not such a predominant part of what we watch, hear and think. It would be impossible and unrealistic to believe that the country would be able to function properly without some control of the information leaked to the general public, but it is also a worrying prospect that we may not know as much as we think we do about the country we live in and the problems facing it. One example of the advantages of censorship is during World War II. It played a major part along with propaganda to maintain a positive atmosphere throughout England, as if all the gruesome details concerning the ever-increasing death rate, the awful state of the soldiers and the destruction of homes and buildings were openly shared, not only would the people of England lose the faith they once had in winning the war, but it would make the country much easier to beat. The army wouldn't have anything to prove, and the German spies closely monitoring the media would be able to pin-point the perfect places to destroy in order to bring morale to such a low that the English would have no choice but to surrender. ...read more.


Violence has become a major issue in these conflicts. Even on T.V the majority of viewers claim that standards have fallen, and unnecessary violence is becoming the norm, shown at too early a time and in inappropriate programs such as Eastenders which was voted the most violent soap. Film producers have noted these complaints and are soon to be enforcing stricter rules on certificating and cutting scenes of a graphic and aggressive nature, or if they deemed as promoting anti-social behaviour. Films being released after these guidelines are imposed will be subject to checking and examination to ensure none of these are present. There was much criticism concerning the glamorisation of drug us, which was taken very seriously due to the rise in the sale and use of drugs by young people over the last 10 years. Graphic and instructive drug related scenes (such as in Train Spotting) will be cut totally from certain films and will not appear in any film with lower than an 18 certificate in the aim to de-familiarise the youth with narcotics and consequently minimise the ever increasing number exposed to them. It is very possible that this will however, just create another 'taboo' subject, making it even more dangerous for those who will continue to use them. ...read more.


when something appears on it that falls in to the latter category. People who want to have the right to see it. Children though may not be totally trusted to decide what films are appropriate viewing for them, and all parents will not make an effort to decide for them. The removing of certificates may result in more Jamie Bulgar cases (where two 10 year olds brutally murdered a 2 year old after watching the film 'Chuckie', mimicking the methods used by the doll). Having said this, we can not assume that all children are the same. Maturity varies and the tolerance and understanding does also, making it seem unfair whatever decision is met. I therefore agree that the current system is the most apt, where films have ratings that must be adhered to, and programs have specific times that it can be aired on although I believe that programs should be told in more depth to prepare the viewer better for what they are about to watch. In conclusion too many people are unhappy for the government to keep things how they are. The apathetic can't be allowed to drag down the numbers and stop a positive change happening just because it doesn't affect them. Nothing will turn Britain in to a Utopia, but T.V. is influential enough to try and improve it slightly at least. ...read more.

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