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Why does street crime have such a hold on the public imagination? Is it because crimes against a person or personal possessions are more important than hidden crimes?

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Introduction

1. Why does street crime have such a hold on the public imagination? Is it because crimes against a person or personal possessions are more important than hidden crimes? It is not that 'hidden crimes' are less important than 'street crime' but rather a belief that crimes committed 'on the street' are usually against an innocent individual, primarily and even unknowingly becoming a victim of crime. This makes it personal ("it could have been me") and may even be seen to cause psychological damage to the victim ("why did it happen to me"). Street crime is generally stereotyped as an act taken on by drug abusers, ethnic minorities or the poor who would rather commit criminal offences as a provision of income than seek paid employment. However, whether this is because of historical attitudes that have long argued this, or the provision of various discourses of information society is provided with by both national and local authorities, it is an area open to debate and can be argued that certain media discourses prejudice and influence its audience, in particular by those who live in poorer parts of the country. Street crime statistics tend to be contradicted by different media discourses, and readers, listeners or viewers from a socially and culturally diverse country such as the UK, interpret these discourses of information very personally indeed. ...read more.

Middle

Family violence in the home tends to be on a patriarchal level, and is usually the man. His behaviour can be very dominating and controlling enabling him to produce (what appears to be) 'the ideal family'. Along with the violence, bullying and intimidation are generally parallel with his behaviour, and with this in mind, self esteem of his victims may be too low, preventing them from developing any skills to challenge him. There are many different types of violence that may occur in the home, punching, kicking, biting, pulling hair, slapping, stamping. As well as the obvious, all these things could be done with objects or even thrown at the victim, such as, sticks, shoes, metal poles, and so on. Finally violence is not just physical, it can be sexual, (rape, molestation and assault) and psychological (intimidating, insulting, and harassment) as well. It is no surprise that two women each week die as a result of domestic violence. Challenging what is morally wrong! There are still many perpetrators who believe that their behaviour is actually part of family life, and although after an incident they may feel some remorse, generally it would happen again and without a question of doubt, the blame would be turned to the victim; adding to this, family discourses who accept that violence is necessary in order to maintain an 'orderly home', 'chastisement' ...read more.

Conclusion

One possible problem with the law is that in tends to look at domestic violence as pathological, offering services to 'seek out' why they behave they do, or offering programmes allowing them to discuss with others why it is they believe they behave the way they do. P.223 Yet how much information is the perpetrator given about what they have personally done to their victims and what damage they have caused to their families because of their actions, how much fear have they installed in their children, and do their children also need to attend such programmes in order to prevent 'copied behaviour' . With the spouse/partner will she also receive as much help coping and adapting to the supposedly reformed character, can she be taught how to trust not only the person who broke the trust in the first place but anyone else again. Finally who is responsible for re-building her self-esteem that has surely been knocked down a peg or two. (OWN WORDS FOR TMA 02) Today, News channels, political channels, documentaries, reality television shows, radio, newspapers, films, drama and many more discourses of information, provide an individual with the fear and fascination neatly packaged in a safe environment which we call 'home'. However, home is not always a safe environment, and yet until very recently 'hidden crimes', many of those which occur outside the home, may be happening between family members in what is usually regarded as a place of security and protection. ...read more.

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