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Cezanne, Lowry and Landscapes.

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� 68����5�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��04-bjbj�2�2 (8�X�X�"���������������8< H�vpppppppp$ R_�<�ppppp<��ppQ���p�p�p�p������pd ������pX�g0��! �! ��4�"����! �� pp�ppppp<<�Cezanne,Lowry and Landscapes Cezanne Paul Cezanne, who was the son of a wealthy banker, became a painter in the 1860s in Paris when he quit his studies of Law. By 1874 he was painting landscapes in the Impressionist manner and had some of his work included in their first exhibition held during that very same year. He painted in the Impressionistic manner, but sheared off in a different direction to the main body of Impressionist painters. The main body of Impressionist painters were concerned with the 'fleeting effects of light and colour', and in order to capture the surface impression of that moment 'they had to work fluently and quickly'. 's analysis was far more prolonged and pains-taking; He spent so long analysing his subjects that some of his work was never finished. began to be more concerned with the use of colour in modelling objects and landscape and as a way of expressing their underlying form. The basic ideas of Cubism have been claimed to be present in his philosophy. His theory was that the painter could always find the cone, the sphere and the cylinder in Nature, and that all natural shapes were composed of these shapes at their most basic form. ...read more.

Middle

In an abandoned quarry near Aix-en-Provence, studied the huge, jagged rocks, and made this dramatic composition, called Bibemus Quarry by contrasting sizes, shapes, and angles. The painting is a circular composition. This is achieved by arranging rock shapes in a pattern. has framed the painting using rocks. Large stones on the left and right guide our eyes into the painting. The horizontal shelf in the middle leans towards a wedge-shaped outcrop that sweeps upward. Soft green plants creep up the slope to a tree on the horizon. The diagonal trunk of a tree cut off by the edge of the painting takes us back along sharply tilted pocks to the middle of the painting. Every stroke of 's brush makes the rocks look solid. He painted patches of red, brown, orange, and grey side-by-side and created 'weightless clouds' in the hazy-looking sky with short brushstrokes, in many shades of green and blue. LAURENCE STEPHEN LOWRY The work of Lowry appears to be childlike and 'naive in style', but he is an immensely skilful painter in my eyes, and one who deserves a lot more credit than he did receive before he died in 1976. Lowry did receive some recognition before the war, he was always underrated, and 'elusive'. It wasn't until a large exhibition was held in 1966 that Lowry became recognised as a unique painter of industrial England. ...read more.

Conclusion

A painting by has been included with this essay, along with a reproduction of one of Lowry's pictures. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ �*�*�*�*f+g+�+�+J,K,�,�,.-/-3-4-������������h-2h-2OJQJh-2h-2CJOJQJ%h-2h-2OJQJfHq� ����)h-2h-2CJOJQJfHq� ����h-2hJuP hJuPh-2%&45#$����EF4556{|X!Y!�#�#�#�# % %�����������������������������gdJuP�*3-�� %%%[&\&�&�&M(N(�*�*�*�*�*�*g+h+i+j+�+�+�+�+K,L,M,N,��������������������������$a$gd-2$a$gd-2gdJuPN,�,�,�,�,/-0-1-2-3-4-����������gdJuP$a$gd-2$a$gd-2 &1�h:pJuP��/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D JuP Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 -2Header ���!4 @4 -2Footer ���!`�o"` -2watermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N -2watermark footer$a$ CJOJQJ4%8���� ���z� ���z� ���z�K�4%h]r�V�:��4- %N,4-3-�"�"�"�"h#j#�#�#L$N$�$�$0%5%�"j#�#5%��alex�-2JuP�@�"P��4%P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&�� �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h�C�F�C�F�C�F��������������4�"�"3�� H�?������������������JuP��Cezanne,Lowry and LandscapesTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0|���(8��� , 8 D P\dlt�Cezanne,Lowry and LandscapesUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedualexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@�y���@�y���@�y������� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,��|8���H����� ���� � �UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedo�"��"A Cezanne,Lowry and Landscapes Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.com -No, do not redistributecoursework.com/ ���� !"#$����&'()*+,����./01234��������7����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �F@�����9�1Table��������WordDocument��������(8SummaryInformation(����%DocumentSummaryInformation8������������-CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

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