• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did Brett Whiteley portray the body?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Brett Whiteley How did Brett Whiteley portray the body? In the same way Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo used techniques to express the body in a way they thought was acceptable - as it was, Whiteley used techniques to express the body in a way he thought was acceptable. By doing so, Whiteley added character and life into his artwork, by distorting and changing the form. Instead of simply drawing what he saw, Whiteley expressed in a way he thought would communicate his point the most. By doing so, Whiteley would distort shapes, change lines, and exaggerate certain body parts that he felt were 'important.' Leonardo chose to capture the body nearly exactly they way it would be found in reality and that was how he thought would converse his point the most, and so did Whiteley, though he chose to portray the body in a completely different way, proving that it was just as effective. ...read more.

Middle

Body parts are defying gravity and can float or sink any direction. He emphasised the abstract nature of his artworks and the feeling of vivaciousness and sensuality, especially of women. Whiteley produced over one hundred and fifty original prints between 1961 and 1992 and used various printmaking techniques to express the full range of his subject matter, from figurative conception, through to landscape, still life, nudes, animals and birds, to the most explicit erotica. Indeed the very breadth of techniques employed by Whiteley, including etching, lithography, woodcut and hand-worked photo-screen, echoed the boundaries that he challenged through his painting and sculpture. "Brancusi in sculpture and Matisse in graphics were the two artists that particularly made one aware of respecting the integrity and truth of each medium whether it be marble, cedar, lithography, charcoal etc; that the pen behaves so differently from the brush, that to draw on copper with a fine nail suits certain subjects, that to draw with a greasy crayon on stone is perfect for others, the nude for example. ...read more.

Conclusion

His work was shown at the Whitechapel and Marlborough galleries from 1961, and in that year he was selected to represent his country at the 'young Painters' Convention' UNESCO. Even more crucial to his future was his success in winning the International prize at the second 'Biennale de Paris' (International Biennale for Young Artists), which brought with it the excitement, glamour and disadvantages of world publicity in Paris. After 1961 he returned to Australia. What he learned from his contacts with such countries as Cambodia, Vietnam and Japan is expressed in his drawings and paintings, and even more in sculptures such as his 'Asia', a construction in fur, steel and acrylic in which a white wallaby was depicted with its head stuck in a sewerage pipe. During the 1979s he won a number of national prizes and settled at Lavender Bay. Whiteley continued to receive a number of awards for his artworks. His colourful life ended in the same nature; he committed suicide in a motel in NSW in 1992. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Art section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Art essays

  1. Artists express their personal experiences, social values and cultural beliefs through a number of ...

    Claude Lorrain lived most of his life in Rome and was inspired by the ancient architectural ruins and statues. He has included these ruins in Landscape with Ascanius shooting the stag of Sylvia as well as including figures from mythology.

  2. Visit To London Aquarium

    * To relieve the pressure on Atlantic cod - buy cod that is marked "line caught fish from Icelandic & Norwegian waters". * Currently in the UK only 4% of expenditure on food is on fish. * Wild stocks of Atlantic salmon have decreased by 50% in the past 20

  1. Francis Bacon

    because he wouldn't have had the same effect as he has got, it wouldn't have had the same feeling or textures to portray the message that the painting is putting across.

  2. The boundaries between culture and nature have collapsed and the body has become flexible

    For those who can afford it, there is the option of the surgeon's knife, used widely in the West to combat the ageing process, to eliminate unwanted physical features (K. Davis 1995) or even as a means of mobilizing the body as an artistic canvas (K.

  1. The Character of Leonardo

    This painting would be the only portrait Leonardo would do of a man. The painting displays a man positioned in a three-quarter stance holding onto a partition sheet. The background is left in shadow, as the musician seems to stare out past the audience's field of vision.

  2. The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci

    order in which they occur in the originals would at all fulfil his intentions. No reader could find his way through such a labyrinth; Leonardo himself could not have done it. Added to this, more than half of the five thousand manuscript pages which now remain to us, are written

  1. Art - the Modern Age era

    Instead of the story of betrayal by Judos, he drew the first communion. Although the painting is very expressive and exciting, the subject is of a joyous festival. Tintoretto is a true Mannerist. He decided upon a different scene and brought it alive with colors, composition, and movement.

  2. Did Max Beckmann's experiences of war contribute to his success as a painter?

    It is the view of many critics that Beckmann drew his inspiration not only from the event itself but also from Theodore Gericault's The Raft of the Medusa (see appendix). His painting is everything that Gericault's is not. There is no feeling of intensity, terror, hope, conflict or despair, instead

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work