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Paul Cézanne

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Introduction

Paul C�zanne He was born in Aix-en-Provence on January 10th, 1839, into a middle class family, and took a classical course of studies at his school in Aix and developed a strong friendship with future writer, Emile Zola. He then went on to study literature and law at his local University, but his passion for art was too strong, so he didn't complete his studies. His whole life revolved around his art and neither the social events of the times, or the Franco-Prussian War in 1870 had any effect on him. His Influence on the Impressionists. Many of his early works were painted in dark tones and applied with heavy, fluid pigment, suggesting a moody, romantic expressionism of the previous generations. Like Zola carried on his interest in the realist novel, C�zanne also developed a commitment to the representation of contemporary life, painting the world that he observed without a concern for stylistic affectation. ...read more.

Middle

C�zanne's use of colour During the 1980's and 90's he continued to paint studies from nature and in excellent Impressionist colours, but gradually, he simplified his application of the paint to the point where he seemed able to define volumetric forms with strokes of pure colour. Critics argued that C�zanne had discovered a means of rendering both natures' light and it's form with a single application of colour. He seemed to be reintroducing a formal structure that the impressionists had abandoned, without sacrificing the sense of brilliant illumination they had achieved. C�zanne spoke of 'modulating' with colour, rather than 'modelling' with dark and light. By this he meant, replacing an artificial convention of representation, with a more expressive system (modulating) that was still closer nature or as C�zanne said, ' parallel to nature.' ...read more.

Conclusion

However, in 1985, a man named Ambroise Vollard, an ambitious Paris art dealer arranged a show of C�zanne's works, and over the next few years promoted them successfully. By 1904, C�zanne was featured in a major official exhibition, and by the time of his death, Aix October 22, 1906 he had attained the status of a legendary figure. During his last years many younger artists travelled to Aix to observe him at work and to receive many words of wisdom he might offer. Both his style and theory remained mysterious and cryptic; he seemed to soma a na�ve primitive, while to others he was a sophisticated master of technical procedure. The intensity of his colour, along with the apparent stubbornness of his compositional organisation, signalled to most that, despite the artist's own frequent despair, he had synthesised the basic expressive and representational elements of painting in a highly original matter. ...read more.

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