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Romanticism vs Classicism

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Introduction

Jonathan Vaughan Ms Crow Period 6 13th October 2009 Romanticism v. Classicism Romanticism and Classicism are two very contrasting movements that focus largely on philosophy, art, and literature. The two styles dwell on very similar subjects but offer alternate perspectives. Romanticism was a revolutionary movement in which humanity's view toward art, nature, and themselves were re-thought. Romanists focus very much on the individual upon this Earth and glorify our path towards spiritual and moral development. Within this magnificent journey, nature and intuition are glorified above reason. In contrast, the philosophy of Classicism is very restrained and generally does not delve into the unknown. Classicism strictly sticks to the given ideals of society not going beyond the norms of a culture. These two ideologies rub off substantially on their surrounding cultures and, as a result, the dissimilarities within these philosophies are present within society today. ...read more.

Middle

Subjects are much more reserved and serious. Images can be brutal and uninspiring, yet realistic and pleasant. Objects are defined by ridged, straight lines and are frequently dull in color. The surroundings are not flattering but remain accurate interpretations of common society. Again, all qualities associated with Classical thinking are heavily reflected within Classical painting. Unlike Romantic painting, Classical painting follows a very conservative depiction of life where no image or technique is out of the ordinary. Contrasting appearances and techniques between Romanticism and Classicism are resoundingly evident in architecture. Architecture during the Romantic era primarily takes the form of gothic style, which is very elaborate and unique. This eye-catching style began in twelfth century France but died out soon after. In the mid eighteenth century England, however, Gothic architecture re-emerged when artists sought an alternative to the current repetitive Classical architecture. ...read more.

Conclusion

As with Classical thinking, Classic architecture is very mainstream and conventional. Romanticism and Classicism are two contrasting movements that have had major influential effects on human culture. The way in which we think can even be defined as either Romantic or Classical. Those who think rationally and logically are generally considered Classic-minded. People who do things more impulsively, however, are more Romantic-minded. Each philosophy offers its own unique characteristics. Romanticism generally idealises individuals and nature emphasizing their spiritual and moral values. It explores new concepts in life searching for what other beauties life may hold. Additionally, Romanticism adopts alien concepts and techniques to create groundbreaking, eye-catching art. Classicism, however, is quite the opposite and remains simple using trustworthy techniques. The movement follows strict values evident in life and does not dwell much beyond reality. Both beliefs have had major influences in art, within painting and architecture particularly. Through the contrasting techniques and physical appearances, the many differences of the two movements are evident. Through our artwork, we can learn much about the different philosophies of humanity. ...read more.

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