• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Art
  • Word count: 2384

The Effects of the Nazi Political Movement on German Visual Arts

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Effects of the Nazi Political Movement on German Visual Arts "We shall discover and encourage the artists who are able to impress upon the State of the German people the cultural stamp of the Germanic race... in their origin and in the picture which they present they are the expressions of the soul and the ideals of the community." -Hitler, Party Day speech, 1935. Abstract: In European history, one often hears of the tragedies and violations against humanity caused by the Nazi Party both before and during the Second World War. The Nazi political movement was without a doubt, one of the most dramatic developments of the 20th century. Any exposure of ideas that were not promoted by the Party was denied. Visual arts naturally fell under this category of self-expression, as one of the most powerful types of artistic expression in society. In this essay, questions will be raised as to what effect this drastic political movement had on the German art at the time. Essentially, art was one of the most successful ways of increasing support for Hitler. Artistic expression simply became part of the Nationalist social political tactics. The art of the Third Reich helped to shape the German people's attitudes by having both discrete and indiscrete political messages, with stereotyped, idealized images. ...read more.

Middle

Even though the style of this painting is not particularly political, the themes of health, collective action, athletic strength, and competition are clearly put forward to spread the views of Nazi German. This painting4, by Arthur Kampf, is of 1933 Nazi seizure of power on 30th January. It shows the procession of a huge torch being lit. This piece serves as a memory of a historical event. It displays a dominance of law and order, soldiers are standing armed, in single file, and the public is saluting them in praise and acceptance. The light of the big torch can be seen as the main focus point as it is placed in the center of the painting. Perhaps it represents a brighter future as light often symbolizes optimism. Since it was painted in 1938, and the procession was held in Berlin in 1933, it must be glorifying the beginning of a new Germany in contrast to the Great Depression of the late 1920's. Before understanding the effects of the political influence on German art, it is important to have some knowledge of the movements and direction of the existing art before Hitler's time. German art was flourishing like never before during the Weimar Republic years. Some background information on 'pre-dictatorship' German art is therefore necessary in order to place the art movement in context. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the religious parallels are quite small-minded and superficial. The idea of supporting Hitler is straightforward and very one-sided, like all heroic art pieces. . The Nazis viewed this as one of their best posters. It too is by Mj�lnir. The caption translates: "National Socialism: The Organized Will of the Nation." Goebbels claimed that Mj�lnir perfected the art of drawing the Nazi Storm Trooper. This poster is from the September 1930 Reichstag election, in which the Nazis made their electoral breakthrough. the caption: "The people rise! They vote List 9". Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks From the July 1932 Reichstag election. The text translates as:"We women vote for List2:National Socialists." This interesting poster appeared in 1932. The usual approach with posters is to use color to make them stand out. This one stands out because of Hitler's disembodied face floating on a black background. This is another November 1932 poster: "Hitler Builds." Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks. Conclusion: One perspective is that all 'Nazi' art can be looked upon as simple expressions of political motivation, rather than the work of skillful painters. However the aesthetic effort put into any piece of art should be appreciated and not be disregarded purely because of the political opinions it represents. The concept of art is hard to define, for example, sixty years ago; statues of Hitler were considered art in Berlin. Now, any public display of a Nazi symbol is illegal. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Art section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Art essays

  1. Impressionism was the most important Art movement of the nineteenth century, having a great ...

    as in it there are many flowers and Monet paints them with a seldom use of detail.

  2. The boundaries between culture and nature have collapsed and the body has become flexible

    beard, Memory loss, Madness, Going senile, Speech impediment, Running out of time, Unfulfilled, Secret sex (doing it quietly), Loss of independence, Incontinence, Libido?, Becoming your mother, House-bound, Repulsive knickers, Unable to breathe, Unattractiveness, Loss of temperature control, Not trusting your body any more, Poverty, Not acceptable to snog everyone in

  1. With Reference to the French 'enlightenment' notions on femininity masculinity and the family, describe ...

    In spite of this women were more politically active after the revolution than before even though this type of activity was seen as highly illegal. Men and women were seen as entirely different. Jacques-Louis Moreu, an anthropologist of the 18th century stated that: 'Not only are the sexes different, but

  2. On the floor I am more at ease, I feel nearer, more a part ...

    Nei primi anni '30 Pollock conosce e apprezza le pitture murali di Jos� Clemente Orozco e Diego Rivera; per tutto il decennio viaggia molto negli Stati Uniti, ma per la maggior parte del tempo vive a New York, dove si stabilisce definitivamente nel 1935 e dove lavora per WPA Federal

  1. The Realist movement.

    The white woman being bathed by the slave in a very extravagant bathroom is very real and ideal to the white culture that is viewing the work. However, if one was to travel to this part of the world, I think they would see a different picture.

  2. Marcel Duchamp is considered as one of the most influential artists of the 20th ...

    In this work Duchamp uses four or five overlapping profiles moving from left to right across the canvas. The colors were dark symbolizing Duchamp's mood at the time. He was preparing to leave Paris in favor of, what he believed to be a less commercial area, Munich.

  1. "The arts deal in the particular, the individual and the personal while the sciences ...

    As AoKs are tools, they can have a certain connotation on the knowledge formed (and they usually do, as it was described in the previous paragraph) but are still basically neutral until applied in obtaining knowledge over a certain subject.

  2. Since my first encounter with Kandinsky's art I was amazed by their complexity and ...

    In 1896 at the age of 30, he left Moscow for Munich leaving a job as the director of a printing works specializing in art reproductions. Munich - a New Beginning Munich had become a rising artistic city, with a number of new and innovative art movements for example, founded

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work