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The Mona Lisa displays a painting of a woman who is dressed in the Florentine fashion of her day and is seated in a mountainous landscape. It is a remarkable piece of Da Vincis technique of soft, heavily shaded modeling.

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Introduction

The Mona Lisa By: Janaki Dasari Janaki Dasari Professor Mark Williams 1 April 2009. Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci. The painting that I chose is the Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci. This painting is a portrait of a woman that is the most famous painting in the world since the 16th century. Research shows that Mona Lisa was the wife of a wealthy Florentine merchant whose name is Francesco del Giocondo. This painting was made as a celebration of the birth of their second child named Andrea (Mona Lisa, Wikipedia). One of the reasons I like the Mona Lisa is because it is very interesting and it still affects us today. Mona Lisa is very famous for her smile in the painting and it is known that she is smiling from any angle. ...read more.

Middle

It is a remarkable piece of Da Vinci's technique of soft, heavily shaded modeling. Leonardo used the shape of a pyramid to place the woman in the center and the folded hands of Mona Lisa are the end of the pyramid. This painting was created in a highly structured place where it shows half the length of the woman that is set on the background. One can also see that there is an even glow of light that lands on her face, neck and hands. The way the woman is sitting in the painting shows her reserved posture and the expression on her face also shows that she is focused on her painter. The woman's curves of her hair and clothing are echoed by the small background. Her smile is one of the most important aspects in this painting and it shows the visual representation of happiness. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, to bring out the plain beauty of the Mona Lisa, Leonardo Da Vinci made her clothes a dark shade as well as the background behind her so that most of the light will be reflected off her facial features, showing the beauty of the portrait. Another thing to notice about this painting is that the Mona Lisa has no facial hair whatsoever. If you look closely, you can see that she does not have any eyelashes or eyebrows and Leonardo painted her this way because it was a very common thing for the woman of that time period to pluck them all off. This painting is admired by all because of the great beauty that is shown by Mona Lisa and the technique that Leonardo Da Vinci uses to create the different shades of light that contribute to her beauty. ?? ?? ?? ?? Dasari 1 ...read more.

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