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A Business analysis in respect to Boots.

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Introduction

Recruitment & Selection Why recruit staff? Boots will recruit staff for a number of reasons, which include: * The growth of the business * Changing roles within the business * Filling vacancies created by resignation, retirement or dismissal * Internal promotion The growth of the business When Boots grows in size it will probably need more people to carry out existing jobs and new jobs. When existing jobs are being expanded, human resource specialists simply need to copy existing practice on a larger scale. In creating new jobs more detailed thought is required; particularly if the jobs are quite different from those that already exist within the company. Changing job roles within the business In recent years most British businesses such as Boots have changed their job structure. In particular, the country has seen the decline of many routine, standardised jobs. Increasingly, employers have sought to develop new jobs involving information and communications technology, and which involve ground-level employees taking more responsibility for decision-making through empowerment. Developing new jobs requires considerable research, often by examining best practice in an industry or by looking at the development of new jobs in other countries. Filling vacancies created by resignation, retirement or dismissal In many organisations people move on and also employees in Boots move on as well. People get older, they hand in their notice or they are dismissed. In most cases it is necessary to replace the employee. However, the manager responsible for recruitment has to decide whether the firm wants a carbon copy of the previous job holder or whether the job has moved on, requiring new skills and competences. Internal promotion In Boots there will be opportunities for internal promotion. Internal promotion gives an employee something to aim for in the organisation, rather than looking elsewhere. When one person is promoted, it is often necessary to replace him or her. Getting the recruitment process right The recruitment process can be very costly. ...read more.

Middle

Salary expectation: Figures are not always necessary, but an indication of the salary level should always be given. Address and contact: This should appear, with a telephone number if appropriate. Qualifications: Certain jobs require a minimum entrance qualification, which should be clearly stated. Experience: This should be quantified, as it will have a bearing on the expected salary level. Fringe benefits: The advertiser may wish to mention a company car, a health insurance scheme and so on. Organisational identity: This may be in the form of a logo (or simply the name of the organisation). A good job advert, while providing prospective candidates with helpful information, also helps to discourage applications from people who do not have the required qualifications for the job. The presentation of the advert is very important as it gives prospective employees a first impression of the organisation. Letter of application The title pretty much speaks for itself when describing what a letter of application is. Basically, a letter of application is a letter that an applicant would send to an organisation when interested in a job on offer. In this case, the applicants for the part-time sales assistant would send their letters to Boots after seeing the advert for the job. Along with the letter of application the employees would send their Curriculum Vitae (CV). An example of a letter of application can be found in the appendix. Curriculum Vitae A Curriculum Vitae (CV) shows a person's achievements, hobbies, interests and past-times. A CV is a vital ingredient to recruiting the best employee - in this case the best part-time sales assistant. Below shows an example of a CV that could be sent with the letter of application to Boot's HRM sent by an applicant enquiring about the job of a part-time sales assistant on offer. Once Boot's HRM have evaluated the letter of application of the applicant they can decide whether or not he/she is suitable for the job. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, selection can be very costly to Boots. For example, if Boots were to send out application forms to candidates the cost of postage has to be paid for and Boots may have to pay for travel expenses for candidates' journeys to interviews. Staff will also have to give up time to carry out the interviews. For example, if 10 people were interviewed for three posts by Boots, but only one applicant was suitable, selection may not have been effective. In this case Boots would have to re-advertise and interview other candidates as two posts would be unfilled. Boots' Human resource department's role would be to check all stages of selection to find out where problems had arisen. For example, when short-listing, a suitable candidate may have been 'left out'. At an interview a possible candidate may have been rushed, so he/she was not given the chance to do their best. Legal factors It is now illegal for Boots or any other organisation to specify sex, marital status, colour, race, nationality or disability in any job advertisement. These laws were brought in by the government due to the Sex Discrimination Act (1975 and 1986), the Race Relations Act (1970), and the Disability Discrimination Act (1995). An Industrial Tribunal is available for people who feel that they have been discriminated against by any organisation, for example, during an interview. This Industrial Tribunal can award damages if it feels that a person has a fair case of being discriminated against by an organisation. Another "Act" that can be looked upon as discrimination by an organisation is the Equal Pay Act (1970). This implies that men and women must receive equal pay if the work that they do is the same or similar. Boots have always followed the laws of the Sex, Race Relations, Equal Pay, and Disability Discrimination Act's so not to cause a confrontation between the company itself, the person(s) discriminated against and the Industrial Tribunal. They always deploy a system where by such discrimination acts are followed. ...read more.

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